The Banner of Ulster - Friday, 5 August 1842

Marriages

On the 26th ultimo, by the Rev. John Hanna, Presbyterian Minister of Clogher, ROBERT REID, Esq., of Woodvale House, to Miss Martha M'Master, only daughter of Mr. JAMES M'MASTER, merchant, of Tyhany.

On Tuesday the 2d instant, by the Rev. James Denham, Mr. JOHN SEDLY of Dublin, to ELIZA, eldest daughter of Mr. James Osborne of this city.

On the 2d instant, by the Rev. Josias Wilson, Mr. SAMUEL MARTIN, to SARAH JANE, daughter of Mr. William Jamieson of Little Donegall Street.

On the 26th ultimo, at Trinity Church, Chelsea, by the Rev. Wm. Palmer, now of Worcester College, Oxford, the Rev. JOHN HILL, Rector of Donaghadee, to MARIANNE ISABEL, second daughter of the late John Milward, Esq., of Bromley, Middlesex.

Deaths

At Strabane, on Wednesday the 27th ultimo, in the fifty-eighth year of his age, Doctor HUNTER of Ramelton.

Of fever, at Armagh, on the 1st instant, in the twenty-second year of his age, Mr. JAMES ELLIS, Printer -- a young man of most amiable disposition, whose premature death is deeply regretted in the circle of which he was an ornament.

On the 27th ultimo, at his residence, Millview, County Monaghan, John Harpur, Esq., aged twenty-seven years.

On the 27th ultimo, at Glenvale, Drumbo, Mrs. SNOWDEN, aged eighty years.

On the 30th ultimo, MARGARET, eldest daughter of Wm. Simpson, Esq., of Larne.

On the 23d ultimo, at the Castle House, Ilfracombe, Lady WREY, wife of Sir Bouchier P. Wrey, Bart., formerly of Castleconnell, Limerick.

On Sunday evening, at his house, Carysfort-avenue, Dublin, THOMAS DUNNE, Esq., Solicitor.

Clippings

Domestic Intelligence

Ireland.

THE CONSTABULARY. -- Mr. Fitzimon, late S. I. of Police in this town is, we understand, to be stationed in Kerry. -- Clare Journal.

The Ocean steamer arrived at the port of Waterford on Sunday last, from America, in perfect safety.

EXAMPLE TO IRISH LANDLORDS. -- The Earl of Kingston has employed upwards of one thousand men for the last six weeks, of whom over three hundred, from distant parts of the country, are boarded and lodged by his Lordship. -- Cork Examiner.

On Thursday morning, as two witnesses were being escorted into Nenagh, to give evidence at this Assizes, they were fired at -- one was shot in the shin, the other wounded in the head. -- Nenagh Guardian.

MELANCHOLY ACCIDENT. -- On Sunday night a fine young man, named William John Morrison, aged about nineteen years, the son of Mr. Morrison of Castle Street, Dublin, met his death in a very lamentable manner, by falling from the top window of the house, a height of at least fifty feet.

NENAGH ASSIZES. -- CONVICTION FOR MURDER. -- On Monday last, James Shee, alias Smith, was convicted of the murder of Rody Kennedy, at Loughane, county Tipperary, on the 21st of May last, and sentenced to be hanged. When the Judge asked why sentence of death should not be passed upon him, he said -- "I protest to the Blessed Virgin that I had no hand in it! O my Lord! spare my life!" The prisoner then wept most piteously, and implored the crowded Court to pray for his soul. On the 30th ult., at the same assizes, Pat. Hayes and John Sleevin were tried for the murder of Samuel Hardy, at Dolla; but the Crown withdrew that charge, and admitted a plea of guilty to an indictment for stealing fire-arms from the house of the deceased. They were sentenced to be transported for fifteen years.

ATTEMPT AT MURDER. -- We learn the following particulars relative to an outrage which took place on Friday last, in the county Tipperary:-- About half-past two o'clock, after midnight, on Friday the 29th ult., as Thomas and David Hennessy, of Graffin, in the barony of Kilnamanagh, parish of Donohill, and county of Tipperary (the former being under-agent to Mr. Black), were travelling in a cart to the assizes at Nenagh, and when not more than one mile and a-half from home, three shots were fired at them in quick succession, from behind the road ditch, by which Thomas Hennessy received two severe wounds; a bullet also passed through his brother's coat, without taking further effect. -- Dublin Evening Mail.

SUICIDE OF A SOLDIER. -- On Sunday last, a private of the Royal Horse Artillery, stationed in Limerick, committed suicide, by blowing his brains out with a pistol. It appeared, from the evidence given at the inquest, that the deceased had, for a long time, entertained a deep affection for the servant of one of the officers of his own regiment, which, having been slighted by the fair one, led to the committal of the fatal act. The verdict was, that the deceased had shot himself, whilst labouring under temporary insanity.

LONGEVITY. -- Mr. Nagle of Ballynamona Castle, county Cork, writes as follows to the editor, in the last number of the Southern Importer:-- "I think you will not have any objection to insert in your next publication the death of a very old man, my pound-keeper, on part of the lands of Clogher, near Doneraile, named Louis Wholham. He died yesterday at the age of 118 years and seven months. He was married to his first wife more than fifty years, and had no offspring. He married a second wife at the age of 109 years by whom, he has had a son, a fine boy, and very like the father. From his great age I have given him his house and the parish pound for many years rent free, which made him comfortable, and prolonged his life. He never lost a tooth, nor had he a grey hair on his head."

=========================

COUNTY OF MONAGHAN ASSIZES.

CROWN COURT.

BEFORE THE RIGHT HON. JUSTICE PERRIN.

Saturday, July 30.

Judge PERRIN proceeded with the business at nine o'clock.

A Petit Jury being sworn,

James Waldrum was placed at the bar, and indicted for an aggravated assault on Philip Hanniwin, so as to do him grievous bodily harm, on 24th of December last, at Derryvalley; also for an assault on Bernard Hammon and Thomas Hamilton.

Guilty of a common assault.

Patrick M'Kenna, for stealing a mare on 2d March last, at Tavenagh, the property of Owen Connolly. -- Not guilty.

Thomas Kelly, Owen M'Cue, James Kelly, James M'Cue, and Peter M'Cue, for feloniously entering the house of Thomas Brennan, on 10th June last, at Muff, and taking from a chest the sum of 3 8s. 6d. -- Acquitted.

Margaret Duffy, for concealing the birth of her infant child, by secret burial, which had been born alive on 16th April last, at Magheraclune.

The jury acquitted.

Alex. Baillie, for serving a threatening notice on William Bell.

Samuel Anderson, for unlawfully writing and sending a threatening letter to William Parker, on 12th Jane last, at Drumconnell.

The jury acquitted.

William Shaw, for writing and sending a threatening letter to the Rev. Jonathan Thornhill, on 17th Jane last, at Drumullen.

The prisoner was acquitted.

Mary Callan was indicted for the murder of her bastard child, at Creeve, by choking it.

Acquitted.

His Lordship proceeded to sentence the different persons who had been convicted.

Bryan Hann, for cow-stealing, being recommended to mercy by both prosecutor and jury, was sentenced to twelve months' imprisonment, and to be kept at hard labour the second and eleventh month of his confinement; also to be kept in solitary confinement one week in each quarter. Elizabeth M'Nally, larceny, pleaded guilty; three months' imprisonment from the twenty-first of July, the date of committal. Chas. M'Manus, stealing from the person, nine months' imprisonment, from 10th July, the date of committal. Henry Reilly, opening post-bags and breaking seals of letters, six months' imprisonment. James Waldrum, common assault, six months' imprisonment.

PERJURY AND PERSONATION.

A new jury was then sworn to try the case of Wm. Miller.

NEW JURY:-- Philip M'Ardle, jun., Alex. Henry, Felix M'Caffrey, Arthur Boylan, Thomas M'Caull, Bernard M'Quaide, Arthur M'Mahon, Andrew Maxwell, William Fitzgerald, John Hamilton, James Campbell, and James Hughes.

William Miller was then placed at the bar, and indicted for unlawful and corrupt perjury on 4th, April last, at Castleblayney, before Wm. M'Kenna, a Commissioner for taking affidavits, by personating one Thomas Barron, surgeon, and making a false affidavit in that respect.

William M'Kenna, examined by Mr. BREWSTER. -- Is a Commissioner for taking affidavits in the Court of Queen's Bench; produces his Commission; remembers the 4th of April last; was applied to on that day to take an affidavit; the application was made to him in Henry Gray's, at the Post Office; Jas. Gray was then in the Post Office; did not take it at that time; in an hour or so he was sent for to go to the Post Office; went there, and was shown the person who was to make the affidavit; James Gray, Henry Gray, and Richard Burnside, and the person who was to make the affidavit, were there; the person was dressed very decently, with black or dark coat, waistcoat, and trowsers, and fine linens on him; he had a cigar in his mouth, which he was smoking, and a riding whip; was introduced to the person so dressed as being Doctor Barron; refused to take the affidavit of Doctor Barron, as he did not know him; said some person must certify he was Doctor Barron; James Gray said he would certify it, and insisted on him taking the affidavit; said he would take the affidavit off the Postmaster, Henry Gray; James Gray went down for Henry Gray, but he did not appear; he then left the place, and shortly after Richard Burnside came for him; went to the Post Office and saw Henry Gray; he appeared to be drunk; refused to take his certificate there; went home and shut his shop and went to bed; about nine o'clock, some persons came to the house; his wife answered them; he .did not see who was then at the door; in an hour after, there was a loud knock at the door; got up and put his head out of the window, and saw James Gray, Richard Burnside, John Fleming, and the Doctor; Henry Fleming spoke up to him, and said all was right; and to come down; went down and opened the door; the men came into the house, to an office off the hall; Mr. Fleming had the affidavit in his hand. (Affidavit produced.) This is the document which was produced; it was John Fleming brought it in, and handed it to him; John Fleming asked him what was he to write on it? told him he had to certify that he knew the Doctor; this Fleming did; the prisoner then signed the affidavit, "Thomas Barron, Surgeon;" is sure the prisoner is the person who signed the name; handed him the book, and administered the oath; he took it; asked him was the contents of the affidavit true? he said they were; asked him was that his name and handwriting? he said it was; there is an erasure in the certificate; when brought to him it was written, "And I know deponent;" put out the word deponent, and substituted that "I know John Fleming, who knows deponent;" he then signed the affidavit they said that the reason they were in a hurry was because it had to go into a lawyer's hands next day; never saw the real Dr. Barron until he came to these Assizes; when in the Post Office drawing-room, James Gray said the prisoner was Dr. Barron; the Doctor did not speak to him, but saluted him; he smoked his cigar away quite quietly.

John Fleming, examined by Mr. HANNA. -- Lived at Castleblayney in April last; was there on the 4th of April; saw the prisoner Wm. Miller on that night; had never known him before; saw him first before eleven o'clock at his house; had been in bed but had got up; the prisoner came with James Gray, who had been at his house once before on that evening. The prisoner did not come in, but James Gray did; at the request of James Gray, he went up to M'Kenna's, the Commissioner's, with him; the prisoner followed them; when they got to M'Kenna's house he rapped at it; M'Kenna came to the window; asked him to come down, which, he did reluctantly; he, James Gray, and the prisoner at the bar, then went into M'Kenna's little office; James Gray produced an affidavit that he had previously engrossed for him on the same night; when M'Kenna took the affidavit in his hand he said, "I don't know Dr. Barron, and I'll not take the affidavit unless you certify to knowing him; he addressed this to him (the witness); James Gray then said to him, "Mr. Fleming, do you doubt my veracity?" said he had no reason to do so, on which James Gray said, pointing to the prisoner, "that's Dr. Barron." He then turned to M'Kenna and said it was a pity of Gray; said that he (M'Kenna) might as well take the affidavit; M'Kenna said he would take the affidavit if he would certify it; said he would; he then pointed to that part of the affidavit (witness here pointed to the jurat) and told him to sign his name to it; did so. M'Kenna then told prisoner to sign his name, which he did, signing, "Thomas Barron, Surgeon." M'Kenna then swore "the Doctor," and he answered him the usual questions; an alteration was then made in the jurat, to the effect that he (witness) knew the deponent; James Gray then said, addressing the prisoner, "Doctor, go down to my uncle's, Henry Gray's, before me, and when I go down I will pay you your guinea;" the prisoner then left, and when he was leaving Burnside came to the door and told James Gray to make haste or the coach would be in; M'Kenna having signed his name, James Gray left with the affidavit; he then went home, and, going up the street, he saw the coach going through the town.

DEFENCE.

Mr. WRIGHT addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner at the bar. He denied that it was Miller who was the doctor engaged in the transaction, and he hoped to be able to prove so satisfactorily to them.

James Finlay, examined by Mr. WRIGHT. -- Knows (the would-be doctor) Miller; remembers the 4th of April; knows a man named Rowland; saw him on that evening in Mr. Gray's of Ballibay, between six and seven o'clock; he was walking about through the house; saw a jaunting-car; he was walking about when he was putting the horse in the car; Rowland went on before the car; he was dressed in a dark frock coat, and dark drab trousers; saw Miller; he was in Ballibay also, and was to drive the car, and was dressed in a brownish frock coat, something short in the waist; saw the car return about four o'clock in the morning; Miller was dressed in the same clothes, and so was Rowland.

Richard Burnside, examined by prisoner. -- Followed James Gray up to M'Kenna's office; Saw Mr. Fleming, Gray and M'Kenna, standing at a desk in the office, writing and he saw a fourth person, but it was not Miller; recollects that he (prisoner) was about the horse when he went up to M'Kenna's; he had a frock coat and cap on, and a piece of yellow braid round the cap; the man at M'Kenna's was dressed in dark clothes.

Judge PERRIN charged the jury, who returned a verdict of guilty.

His LORDSHIP then sentenced the prisoner to be imprisoned for one month, and then transported for the term of seven years.

The jury in Sam. Gray's case having been discharged, the Assizes terminated. -- Newry Examiner.

=========================

GALWAY ASSIZES.

Thursday, July 28.

THE LATE DUEL NEAR BALLINASLOE.

Owen Lynch was put to the bar charged with the wilful murder of Malachi Kelly, by having discharged a loaded pistol at him, and thereby inflicting a mortal wound of which he languished from the 28th day of May until the 3d of June, 1841, and then died. The prisoner, who is a young gentleman of prepossessing appearance, was dressed in mourning, and was defended by Messrs. Fitzgibbon, Q.C., and Concannon. He sat at the sidebar, but, by direction of the Court, was placed in the dock.

Witnesses were examined, who proved that the duel had been what is called a "fair" one.

Mr. FITZGIBBON, Q.C., addressed the jury on behalf of the prisoner, and contended that, as there was no evidence of express malice, they could not find a verdict against his client for wilful murder. He alluded to the case of Hatfield, who had deliberately loaded his pistol, selected a convenient spot for his purpose, and fired at the King of England, and yet a jury found that he did so without malice. He contended that Mr. Lynch was not actuated by any unkindly feeling towards the deceased.

Judge TORRENS then proceeded to charge the jury. He told them that express malice might be shown by violent actions, strong, expressions, or hidden contrivances, but that malice might be inferred from the commission of the act itself. He trusted that the day was fast approaching when the system of duelling, so long the bane and disgrace of the country, would he extirpated from the breadth and length of the land, and that all good men would not alone suppress it by the force of public opinion, but by their verdicts in a court of justice. He hoped that his observations would be attended to as well by the jury whom he addressed, as by the young gentlemen whom he saw in the opposite box, and that if ever they were entrusted with the care of their friend's honour, they would consult the aged and the wise, and, by becoming peace-makers among men, they would deserve the blessing promised by a just and merciful Providence, "that theirs shall be the kingdom of heaven." The learned Judge, in a beautiful and feeling address, commented upon the leading features of the case, and having explained the law, left it in the hands of the jury.

The jury, after some deliberation, returned a verdict of not guilty.

=========================

TIPPERARY NORTH RIDING. -- JULY 30.

Pat. Hayes and John Slevin were put on trial for the wilful murder of Samuel Hardy at Dolla on the 3d of July, 1842.

The offence with which the prisoners were charged occurred at the close of the late special commission at Clonmel, and, from the interest which it created, the court was crowded to excess. The prisoners were both very young men, particularly Slevin, who is not more than twenty years of age. When the prisoners were called on they pleaded not guilty.

Mr. Hatchell and Mr. Rollestone, as counsel for the prisoners, conducted their defence.

After the examination of several witnesses, the case for the Crown closed, and Counsel for the prisoners called the attention of the court to the indictment, and argued that the Crown should not press the case of murder, but take the prisoners' plea of guilty to an indictment which had been found, charging them with having stolen fire-arms from the dwelling-house of Mr. W. Hardy, it appearing that the prisoners were not the persons who had struck the blow; to which course the Counsel for the Crown, after much discussion, consented, and the bill for murder was then by consent quashed, and the prisoners' plea of guilty received.

Chief Justice Doherty made a most impressive and eloquent address to the prisoners, and concluded by sentencing them to be severally transported for fifteen years. -- Correspondent of Saunders.

=========================

CONVICTIONS AT LIFFORD SUMMER ASSIZES, 1842. -- Mary Anne Lecky, stealing wearing apparel -- to be transmitted to the District Lunatic Asylum until the pleasure of the Lord-Lieutenant be known. Mark Edwards and John Graham, stealing four sheep -- to be imprisoned six months, and kept to hard labour. Daniel M'Daid, cow-stealing -- to be transported for fifteen years. John Mercer, cow-stealing -- to be transported for fifteen years. Alexander M'Adoo, cow-stealing -- to be transported for fifteen years. Charles Hegarty, Whiteboyism -- to be transported for seven years. Michael M'Faden, stealing wearing apparel -- to be imprisoned twelve months, with hard labour. Mary Macky, alias O'Neil, and Sally Ann O'Neil, stealing two pair of shoes, &c. &c. -- to be imprisoned twelve mouths, David Russell, killing Finlay Russell, his father -- to be transmitted to District Lunatic Asylum, until the pleasure of the Lord-Lieutenant be known. John Watt, stealing a swingletree -- to be imprisoned twelve months, with hard labour. Patrick Gallaugher, stealing a watch -- to be transported for seven years. Mark Gillespie, James M'Ginley, and Frank Dunleavy, obstructing the water-guards in the execution of their duty -- like sentence. William Kelly, assault, and riding over a woman and child -- to be imprisoned for nine months, with hard labour. Hugh M'Daid, assault -- to be imprisoned fourteen days. -- Derry Standard.

=========================

THE UNITED STATES.

No. I.

"Farewell, my friends -- farewell, my foes;
My peace with those, my love with those." -- BURNS.

-- -- -- -- -- -- --

SIR, -- Since the application of steam to the navigation of the Atlantic, the United States may be comparatively, and without a figure, considered as our next-door neighbour. So rapid now is the communication between them and us, that we might reasonably expect to be as accurately acquainted with the habits, manners, and customs, of their inhabitants -- social and domestic, in all their details -- as we were with those of England some forty years ago. It may appear an anomaly, but this is not the fact. Tours, travels, residences, observations, and journals have, no doubt, teemed from the press within these few years, and all pretending to give a fair and faithful description of "America and the Americans." But, at least for an operative of this country, to depend implicitly on these for information, he will find himself sadly mistaken, and deficient in many important points, should he ever emigrate to the soil of the "star-spangled banner." Take, for example, the recent works of a Stuart, a Maryatt, a Butler, and a Trollope. They are not only, in many instances, contradictory of each other, as if the places and things they were writing about were in some newly-discovered region, but to the great mass of emigrants they are worse than useless. This is easily accounted for. Moving in a higher sphere, and educated entirely different from the "unwashed mechanic" and hardy labourer, there is no sympathy between their tastes, feelings, partialities, and prejudices. Hence the paucity of useful information that necessarily exists in their volumes, relative to those things that are of primary consequence to the artizan.

From the very commencement of their travels, these learned and honourable personages are at fault. My gentleman philosopher takes his passage in the cabin -- is afraid to come into contact with the people in the steerage -- arrives at port -- is driven in his carriage to a first-rate hotel; and, perhaps, over a tumbler of wine-negus gravely begins to extend the notes he has taken of things nobody ever saw or dreamed about, except himself. He knew nothing about

"The hopes and joys, and doubts and fears,"

of some two hundred human beings that were sailing in the same vessel along with him. He knew nothing about the impositions their ignorance and poverty had exposed them to on their embarkation, and the renewed attacks of cunning and fraud on their arrival at their "desired haven." He knew nothing about their anxiety and difficulty to procure clean but cheap lodgings, or the dilemma they were in to ascertain the correct route to the place of their destination. And the same want characterises all his after peregrinations. It may be said that such memoranda would be too low and minute; but, in my opinion, it is the want of this minuteness that forms a desideratum that requires to be supplied.

Having emigrated to America about two years ago, where I had an opportunity of making observations, which the more wealthy and better learned, for the reasons I have assigned, could not be expected to enjoy -- mixing, as I did, with society they would have deemed derogative to their honour to mingle with, but which forms the very thews and sinews of any state -- I flatter myself I may be able to afford some information, on certain points, that either have been very slightly touched upon, or not touched upon at all. I shall, therefore, with your permission, Sir, lay before your readers, in a short series of letters, the result of what I "heard, saw, and felt." And if these communications should want the ornament of a flowing style, be assured they will contain nothing but truth, which is an ornament I have been taught to value greatly. Had every writer attended more to this -- had they given us facts instead of fiction -- from the sixpenny "Guide" up to the fashionable thirty shillings "Three Years' Residence," we would not have had so much of the Romance of History to complain of.

It is not my intention in these letters to follow any formal or systematic plan. The incidents and reflections will be given in the order and manner in which they occurred. My aim will be to assist intending emigrants to avoid those errors too many run into -- to give a plain unvarnished statement of facts, as regards the condition of the working classes in the northern and manufacturing states -- their labour and its remuneration -- their domestic comforts -- their boasted political and social independence -- their moral and religious knowledge -- and such other practical information as will be of advantage, at least, to those who belong to the working order.

It is generally known that trades unions, a few years back, had obtained a strength, and a universality, that alarmed some statesmen; and terrified not a few of the less extensive employers. Their objects were plausible and specious, but the means often resorted to for securing these ends were indefensible -- sometimes revolting. Perhaps they were, at first, rendered necessary, from the previous existence of other legalised monopolies, and the natural propensity some people seem to have of endeavouring to see their dependents in little better circumstances than paupers. But they soon forgot the original and legitimate purposes for which they were formed, and shamefully and ungratefully abused that boon the Legislature had conferred. After the repeal of the combination laws in 1828, they openly encroached upon the undisputed rights of the employer, by usurping and insulting dictation, and established a tyranny among themselves more oppressive and inquisitorial than ever had been attempted by the most unprincipled of the masters. The employers became at length exasperated at the insolence and knavery of the leaders; and, while they commiserated the ignorance and presumption of their dupes, were compelled to retaliate in self-defence. Strike followed strike; and, as was to be expected, always ending in the discomfiture of the operatives; for, according to their own theory, as all capital is only an accumulation of labour, so a person possessing ten thousand pounds must successfully combat an association of one thousand men who have nothing to depend on but their own ten fingers. The calico printers, cotton spinners, and power-loom dressers, had the three most numerous, wealthy, and best organised unions in Scotland. Their fate need not be told: if they now exist, it is but nominally. Their folly and arrogance accelerated their ruin; and now their last end is worse than their beginning. Let the advocates of universal suffrage read the history of trades' unions, and beware.

The dressers in Glasgow, who had acted with the greatest propriety, proposed a plan of emigration on a limited scale, as an experiment for draining away the superabundant hands that had been introduced into the business, after the triumph of the masters. Fifteen members, who volunteered to go to America, were to receive 9 each, on condition and giving security they would not return for three years, the complement was soon made up. Having acted sometime as secretary for the body -- naturally an enthusiastic lover of liberty -- detesting the very name of slave, which I was taught to believe I was -- believing all the tales I had heard and read about the freedom of the New World -- the high-toned morality and deep religious feelings of its inhabitants -- their intelligence and ingenuity, and the Ellysium prosperity they enjoyed from the vast and untrammelled natural and artificial resources of their country -- these were the motives that induced me to expatriate myself; and I was chosen "clerk of the stores." Having now come to what may be called the proper subject of these letters, the passage-money -- sea-stock -- what kind -- rascality of ship-agents -- impositions at Liverpool -- the voyage -- arrival at New-York -- dexterous cunning of the Yankees -- gullibility of the green-horns searching for lodgings, and other topics, will furnish matter for my next. -- I am, yours, &c, G. D.

Belfast, July 5, 1842.

=========================

THE WAR IN AFFGHANISTAN.

No. III.

I stated, in my last letter, that the law of Courts Martial should be revised. The liberty of the soldier is frequently violated in their present construction -- owing, I am afraid, to private pique or malice being permitted to weigh in their councils. One instance I will offer to the public, which came under my own observation.

Private H------ was a married man, whose wife seemed to be a source of much annoyance to an officer, Lieut. L------, in his assignations with another married female of the regiment in which he, Private H-----, was enlisted. Now this officer, on passing Private H-----'s bungalow, used, on all occasions, to fling out the most opprobrious and disgusting epithets -- "not suited for ears polite." Mrs. H------ was of an easy, goodnatured, mercurial disposition, and generally laughed at the elegant style in which Lieut. L----- undertook to convey the bitterness of his hostility. The ease with which she seemed to encounter him enraged him more; and it so happened that he was officer of the guard on the night of the 4th August, 1840, when her husband was on sentry.

Mr. L------, on visiting the sentry (as is usual in India), discovered, on his approach, and being challenged, that his wife, who had ventured so far, with some warm tea, had been, and was even then, close to him; nay, he heard them discoursing together, and thought, probably, they were planning some means of thwarting him in some of his designs. To prevent the possibility of their imaginary design being put in execution, he confined him off sentry, and here follows the crime he placed against him in the guard report: "(CRIME) -- For having been found asleep on his post, at ---------, when on sentry on the left flank of the regiment or barracks, between the hours of eleven and one o'clock on or about the night of the 4th, or morning of the 5th August, 1840. Dated August 6th, 1840." The trial came on in due time, and, though Private H------ made a most excellent defence, and stated every occurrence that was likely to influence the court in his favour, yet, with the single evidence of the accuser, Lieut. L------, who was his bitter foe, he was pronounced guilty, and sentenced to three months in the cells.

It was usual in the old regime for an officer, when he detected a sentry asleep, to ride off for the sergeant of the guard to be a witness to the fact; but, in this instance, it was dispensed with, for the best of all possible reasons. The sergeant of the guard would have discovered nothing to criminate the soldier; and I think I have established the fact that the "liberty of the soldier was violated, owing to private pique and malice."

Continuing our march upwards, on the 24th April, 1839, we encountered the river again. Our grasscutters, who were dispatched to procure forage, became suddenly attacked by a party of Beloochees, and obliged to retreat to camp. Intelligence of the same was promptly communicated to Major Daly, who instantly ordered out sixteen men and a non-commissioned officer to protect them from further molestation. The party thought, for some time, that the grass-cutters had spread a false alarm, and the troopers began to abuse them for their cowardice; but they exclaimed, "Subbur karow Sahibs, Subbur karow Sahibs (wait a little, Sirs), you'll discover them in the ravine," pointing in that direction. They were not false prophets, for in a short time a number appeared; and, placing their lengthy matchlocks on a rudely-constructed sort of crutch, to give precision to their aim, commenced a brisk fire. One of the troopers' horses was shot; and, as they appeared to be increasing in numbers, a council of war was held among the dragoons, to ascertain the propriety of forwarding a dispatch to the outline picquet for support. A man of the 1st troop was deputed to gallop off instantly. The distance from camp was about six miles. In a very short space of time, our commanding officer and the picquet advanced towards them, at a brisk pace. He was armed with a cavalry pistol and hog-spear -- an unusual weapon in the hands of a dragoon officer, but of decided advantage in a conflict with the crouching Beloochees. On his arrival at the ground, and learning the position in which the party stood, relative to their annoying foes, he determined on an immediate attack. The ground was broken, and intersected with ravines. The soldiers were now divided into parties -- each party pursuing the route dictated to it -- and were ordered to form on his division, when through the ravine. Followed by a portion of the picquet, the Major trotted off; and, whilst descending one of the ravines to get into close quarters with the Beloochees, his pistol went off, in his holster, and the ball passed through his foot. The pain must have been very severe at the time; but, without displaying any uneasiness, he dashed on, and soon encountered them, and speared six of them indiscriminately. In this instance, the advantage of the hog-spear was apparent to every one, as possessing a superiority over the sword, which can rarely do much execution on a prostrate foe, more especially when a charger is going at a brisk pace.

One of the Beloochees, who had fallen in the pursuit, and who seemed perfectly conscious of his fetal situation, endeavoured to excite the commiseration of the gallant leader, by making the most abject salaams -- he succeeded in raising that characteristic feeling of a British officer for a fallen foe. The humanity displayed nearly cost the commander his life. During a temporary abstraction in which he indulged, the ruffian seized his matchlock, and levelled it with murderous aim. The ball passed through the breast of the Major's jacket, and, I believe, partially ruffled the skin.

During this onset, the grass-cutters were busily employed in their rear, netting grass for the horses, which they managed to carry to the camp in peace and triumph. The unflinching bravery, the cool, collected courage of Major Daly in this, as in every other instance, drew forth from every single soldier in the campaign the warmest eulogiums. The gentlemanly, kind, conciliating manner in which he was wont to address the squadrons under his command, his readiness to afford redress, the prompt exertions he at times made to secure the necessary comfort fo troops, earned for him, deservedly, the title of "The Brave Officer; the Soldier's Friend."

On the 25th April, 1839, we marched on Abdallah Khan's fort, where we found forage plentiful, and no obstruction offered to us in securing it; but rations for the soldiery were not procurable. On the 26th we arrived at Chununo. After crossing the Ghauts, over bad and irregular roads, the Beloochees still continued to annoy our rear. Here we were joined her Majesty's 2d Queen's Royal Regiment of Foot, and her Majesty's 17th Foot. The Bombay artillery shortly afterwards joined us. We halted till the morning of the 28th at Chununo; but owing to the scantiness of water, and the total want of forage, we broke up camp in the evening, and, after marching twenty-four miles, arrived early next morning at a village, the name of which I forgot to learn; where there was plenty of grain and forage for the horses, but water was scarce, and of a bad quality. We halted, through dire necessity, on this bleak and inhospitable plain, owing to the dispirited state of our horses, till the 30th, when we broke up the camp, and marched upon Mell. -- Yours very truly, EPSILON.

Belfast, July, 1842.

(To be continued.)

=========================

BOTANIC GARDEN. -- The splendid of the 54th Regiment will attend in Botanic Garden on Thursdays; but when the days attendance will be postponed till the following Saturdays.

=========================

ASSAULT. -- At Petty Sessions, on Wednesday, Samuel M'Connell, proprietor of the tea gardens at Donegall Pass, for an assault upon Mr. Edward Bloomfield of Donegall Street, while in the gardens, on Sunday evening last.

=========================

LAUNCH OF THE "NORTHERN" -- This immense new steamer, lately built by Captain Coppin, was launched on Saturday morning last, in the presence of at least twenty thousand spectators from all parts of the country, and of many from England and Scotland. At eight o'clock the workmen's hammers were first heard -- the wedges were driven -- and the last obstruction was removed at a quarter to nine, when Miss Reid, eldest daughter of the late Rev. Edward Reid of Ramelton, and niece to Joseph Kelso, Esq., broke the bottle at her bow -- the flag with the vessel's name "GREAT NORTHERN" was hoisted -- and the mountain of wood majestically glided into the water. Immediately a salvo Was fired from various pieces of cannon stationed on the wharfs, and the utmost excitement and congratulation succeeded. No accident of any kind occurred. The Great Northern is the largest vessel ever built in this country. Her dimensions are, 220 feet in length; between perpendiculars, 37 feet beam; and 26 feet deep in the hold; burthen, 1750 tons, B.M. She is to be fully rigged as a fifty-gun frigate; the length of main-mast to be ninety feet, and thirty-three inches diameter; main-yard seventy-nine feet, and twenty-two and a-half inches diameter in the slings; fore-mast eighty-three-feet; and mizen-mast seventy-six feet; she will be able to spread 4,600 yards of canvass. There are three decks -- the upper one is to be left entirely clear for action, and to be pierced for forty-four guns; the windlass and capstan gear will be placed 'twixt decks. She is to be propelled by Smith's Archimedean screw, which will he twelve feet diameter, and fourteen feet pitch, but the length will be only seven feet; it is to make eighty-eight revolutions per minute. The gearing consists of a cog-wheel, twenty feet diameter, working into a smaller wheel, five feet diameter, upon whose axis is the shaft of the screw. The engine power consists of two cylinders, sixty-eight inches in diameter, four feet six inches stroke, and to make twenty-two strokes per minute; nominal power about 370 horses; there are to be four air-pumps, nineteen inches diameter, and four feet six inch stroke, and cylindrical boilers. The engines are to be placed close abaft the vessel, leaving the midships clear for passengers. The vessels already fitted with Mr. F. P. Smith's Screw Propeller have given the utmost satisfaction, especially the Archimedes, the first to which the instrument was attached, a vessel of 237 tons, seventy horse power. Besides this vessel and the Great Northern, there have been already built, with the Screw Propeller -- the Princess Royal, 101 tons, forty-five horse power, of Brighton; the Bee of Portsmouth, thirty tons, ten horse power; the Beddington of South Shields, 270 tons, sixty horse power; Novelty, London, 900 tons, twenty-five horse power. There are now building, the Great Britain, 3,600 tons, 1,000 horsepower (!) the Rattler, 800 tons, 200 horse power; two packets for the French Post Office service, 120 horse power; and a French war steamer, L'Orient, of 350 horse power. -- Derry Standard.

=========================

SECRET SOCIETIES.

A RECENT trial at Armagh has excited considerable attention from its result -- the conviction of several individuals, in respectable circumstances, of Ribbonism -- and from the means by which that result was obtained -- the employment of a spy. In the year 1819, and at former periods, there was much excitement felt in the north-west of England and the west of Scotland, on account of the employment of spies by the Government of that day. These fellows professed violent political opinions; propounded them at public meetings, and formed seditious clubs amongst such workmen as they met, and found willing to entertain their projects. When their victims were sufficiently involved, information was given to a magistrate, the parties were arrested, in some instances the spies were adduced as evidence, and a severe punishment was registered on the comparatively innocent persons whom they had led astray. There is no manner of doubt that these spies were employed and paid by the Government; and it would be an easy matter to show that more impolitic step was never adopted by any statesmen. We shall not attempt to deny that, where extensive secret societies exist, it may be necessary to adopt means for their suppression which no honourable man would become the instrument of working out. We shall not too curiously inquire into the precise extent to which the public service may require to stretch private morality. That is a question on which we are not called to decide in expressing unqualified disapprobation of the course pursued by the "approver," Hagan; who seems to have manufactured "Ribbonism" as a profession, with the ulterior view of convicting the criminals whom he had initiated. No Government could be justified in employing means of this description, for the suppression even of Ribbonism; and we regret that some of our contemporaries, whose opinions we respect, have, in this instance, adopted the abominable doctrine, far too common in this country, that the end justifies the means. We wish that Ribbonism were utterly crushed and extirpated; but we see neither reason nor policy in concocting that system for the pleasure of destroying it -- in making men of straw for the amusement of knocking them down again. The evidence of a person who had his living by this trade, would not certainly carry much weight to our mind. From Judge Crampton's charge on this Armagh case, it appears that he greatly disapproves of the means employed to obtain convictions; and we cordially trust that Lord Eliot will fulfil his promise, and institute a searching and stern inquiry into the whole proceeding.

It must not, however, be forgotten, that the persons convicted at Armagh occupied tolerably respectable situations in life. They were neither very poor nor very ignorant men. They knew the strictness of the law against the pernicious societies with which they were connected. They were not unacquainted with the odious purposes of those institutions; and, for these reasons, they do not deserve that commiseration that might be shown to less informed men. Their punishment will, we trust, intimidate, if it does not improve, their coadjutors; who may learn the impossibility of conducting a secret society, competent to effect any great purpose, without including in its ranks many members who will violate their oaths for the price of dishonour. When men have once disgraced themselves and destroyed their own self-respect by becoming members of a secret society, and adopting secret oaths, they will become matured for any other villainy in a short time. There may be a number of ignorant dupes -- and a still smaller number of mad enthusiasts -- sincere in their vows, and inclined to keep them; but, whenever the Government of a country employs its secret service money to ascertain the extent and purposes of a secret society, the information is always furnished.

=========================

Naval and Military Affairs.

The Army.

STATIONS OF THE BRITISH ARMY,
AUGUST 2, 1842.

[WHERE two places are mentioned, the last-named is that at which the depôt of the regiment is stationed.]

CAVALRY.

1st Life Guards. Regent's-park.
2d do. Hyde-park.
Royal Horse-Guards -- Windsor.
1st Dragoon Guards -- Canada, Dorchester.
2d do. Sheffield.
3d do. Nottingham.
4th do. Dublin.
5th do. Cahir, for Dublin.
6th do. Dundalk.
7th do. Ballincollig, for Cahir.
1st Dragoons -- Leeds.
2d do. Exeter.
3d do. Bengal, Maidstone.
4th do. Canterbury.
6th (Enniskillen), do. Birmingham.
7th Hussars. Canada, York.
8th do. Hounslow.
9th Lancers. On passage to India, Maidstone.
10th Hussars. Dublin, for Ballincollig.
11th do. York.
12th Lancers. Dublin.
13th Light Dragoons. Ipswich.
14th do. Bombay, Maidstone.
15th Hussars. Madras, Maidstone.
16th Lancers. Bengal, Maidstone.
17th do. Leeds.

INFANTRY.

Grenadier Guards,. 1st bat. Portman Street.
Do., 2d bat. Canada, London.
Do., 3d bat. Portman St.
Coldstream Guards, 1st bat. St. George's barracks.
Do., 2d bat. Canada, London.
Scotch Fusilier Guards, 1st bat. St. John's Wood.
Do., 2d bat. Wellington Barracks.
1st. Regt. Foot, 1st battal. Gibraltar, Templemore.
2d bat. Canada, Charlesfort.
2d. Bombay, Chatham.
3d. Bengal, Chatham.
4th. Madras, Chatham.
5th. Cephalonia, Kilkenny.
6th. Dover.
7th. Gibraltar, Dover.
8th. Dublin.
9th. Bengal, Chatham.
10th. Passage to India, Chatham.
11th. Newport.
12th. Mauritius, Weedon.
13th. Cabopl, Chatham.
14th. Canada, Derry.
15th. Windsor.
16th. Canterbury.
17th. Bombay, Chatham.
18th. China, Chatham.
19th. Malta, Brighton.
20th. Bermuda, 2d bat. on passage to Bermuda, depôt, Isle of Wight.
21st. Bengal, Canterbury.
22d. Bombay, Chatham.
23d. Canada, Carlisle.
24th. Devonport.
25th. Cape of Good Hope for India, Brecon.
26th. China, Chatham.
27th. Cape of Good Hope, Mullingar.
28th. N.S.W., for India.
29th. On passage for India.
30th. Bermuda, Galway.
31st. Bengal, Chatham.
32d. Portsmouth.
33d. Barbadoes, Waterford.
34th. Gosport.
35th. Mauritius, Clonmel.
36th. Cork.
37th. Limerick, for Birr.
38th. Corfu, Hull.
39th. Madras, Chatham.
40th. Bombay, Chatham.
41st. Madras, Chatham.
42d. Corfu, Stirling.
43d. Canada, Enniskillen.
44th. Bengal, Chatham.
45th. Dublin.
46th. Barbadoes, Templemore.
47th. Barbadoes, Castleburt.
48th. Gibraltar, Guernsey.
49th. China, Chatham.
50th. Bengal, Chatham.
51st. Van Diemen's Land, Harwich.
52d. Demerara, Athlone.
53d. Edinburgh.
54th. Belfast.
55th. China, Chatham.
56th. Cork.
57th. Madras, Chatham.
58th. Dublin.
59th. Antigua, Jersey.
60th. Rifles, 1st bat., Manchester.
2d. bat., Jamaica, Dublin.
61st. Newcastle-on-Tyne.
62d. Bengal, Chatham.
63d. Madras, Chatham.
64th. Nova Scotia, Nenagh.
65th. Plymouth.
66th. Glasgow.
67th. Canada, Youghal.
68th. Canada, Chester.
69th. Saint John's, N.B., for Cork.
70th. Canada, Waterford.
71st. Canada, Chichester.
72d. Manchester.
63d. Gosport.
74th. Canada, Cashel.
75th. Cape of Good Hope, Sheerness.
76th. Halifax, Nova Scotia, for Cork, Newry.
77th. Corfu, Chatham.
78th. On passage for India, Chatham.
79th. Gibraltar, Paisley.
80th. New South Wales, Chatham.
81st. Trinidad, Athlone.
82d. Jamaica, Boyle.
83d. Canada, Armagh.
84th. On passage for India, Chatham.
85th. Canada, Clare Castle.
86th. On passage to India, Chatham.
87th. Mauritius, Hull.
88th. Malta, Longford.
89th. Canada, Drogheda.
90th. Ceylon, Drogheda.
91st. Cape of Good Hope, 2d bat. on passage to the Cape, depôt I. of Wight.
92d. Saint Vincent, Fort George.
93d. Canada, Dundee.
94th. Bombay, Chatham.
95th. Ceylon, Chatham.
96th. Chatham.
97th. Corfu, Chatham.
98th. On passage to China.
99th. Chatham.
Rifle Brigade, 1st bat., Malta, Dublin.
Rifle Brigade, 2d bat., Bermuda.
1st West India Regt., Demerara, Sierra Leone.
2d do., Jamaica, Sierra Leone.
3d do., Sierra Leone.
Ceylon Rifle Regt., Ceylon.
Royal Malta Fencibles, Malta.
Royal St. Helena Regt., Isle of Wight, for St. Helena.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

The 10th Hussars leave Dublin garrison in the following order, and arrive at their, destination on the days mentioned underneath:-- Two troops leave on the 4th and arrive in Ballincollig on the 15th instant; two troops leave on the 5th instant, and arrive in Cork on the 16th instant; and the remaining two troops and head-quarters leave here on the 8th instant; and arrive in Ballincollig on the 18th instant.

One troop of the 7th Dragoon Guards leave Ballincollig on the 8th instant, and arrive in Limerick on the 11th. One troop leaves Ballincollig on the same day, and will arrive in Gort on the 13th. One troop will leave Ballincollig on the 10th instant, and arrive in Clonmel on the 12th.

The head-quarters of the 90th depôt left left Birr on the 29th July, and arrive in Drogheda on the 5th August.

The head-quarters of the 36th Regiment left Cork on the 4th, and arrive in Limerick on the 9th instant.

The head-quarters of the 69th depôt left Tralee on the 2d, and arrive in Fermoy on the 6tn instant.

The head-quarters of the 37th Regiment wil march from Limerick on the 9th, and arrive in Birr of the 12th.

The Sergeant-Major of the Rifle Brigade dropped dead on Tuesday in his apartments at the Pigeon-house fort, Dublin.

MONTHLY MILITARY OBITUARY.

Lieut.-Generals -- Hon. J. Ramsay, Colonel of 79th F., Sir W. P. Carrol, C.B., K.C.H., Nenagh.

Major-General -- R. Home, C.B., E.I.C. Service, Madras.

Colonel -- Lord Rodney, North Hants Mil.

Lieut.-Colonels -- Tyler, K.H. Dep. Qua. Mas. Gen., Windward and Leeward Islands, Barbadoes; Reed, h.p. 71st F.; Walker, late 9 Vet. Bn., Dublin.

Majors -- Kershaw, 13th F. (killed in action at Jellelabad); Meech, R.M.; Dent, formerly of 10th F., Nottinghill.

Captain -- A. Graham, h.p. 25th F.

Lieuts. -- Hobhouse, 13th F. (killed in action at Jellelabad); Macpherson, 22d F., Camp, Currachee; J. Grant, late 2d R. Vet. Bm; Kensington; Short, h.p. 21st F.; Magee, h.p. 38th F., Tan-y-vollt, Cardigan; Adams, h.p. 50th F. Hounslow.

Second Lieut., Cornet, and Ensign -- A. Burton, R. Mar.; Fisher, 3d Dr. Jellelabad; Story, 44th F., Chatham; D. Cameron, h.p., 40th F.; Ridsdale, h.p., 47th F.

Quartermasters -- Clue, 52d F., Fredericton, New Brunswick; W. Clark, h.p. 61st F. (Barrackmaster), Trinidad.

Medical Department -- Assist. Surg. Dr. Mackintosh, 33d F., West Indies; Assist. Surg. Dr. Greer, Staff, West Indies.

Provost Marshal -- James Mitchell, h.p.

According to the last Parliamentary return, there are 14,000 Scotchmen in the army, and 42,000 Irish, the remainder being natives of England and Wales.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

The Navy.

PORTSMOUTH, Sunday. -- The Agincourt (East India Company's ship) arrived yesterday from the eastward. She has several officers and a number of men on board, whom she is about to convey to join their respective regiments in India.

The Imaum, 74, about to proceed to Jamaica to take the place of the Magnificent, which is no longer fit for service, was commissioned yesterday. She is being got ready with all possible despatch, and is expected to be fully equipped by the 10th of August.

The Volage, 26, Captain Sir W. Dixon, which left this port a few months since for North America and the West Indies, has experienced much sickness among her officers and men. By the recent accounts from Jamaica, several of her crew had died, among whom were Lieutenant Davy and the Captain's cleric. Lieutenant Davy was quite a young man, and only promoted to his lieutenancy last January.

PORTSMOUTH, July 30. -- The Dragon, 72, at Milford, is in future to be called the Fame, a new steamer, to be named the Dragon, being ordered to be built. The Pique, 36, is being hurried for immediate service; and is reported ready on the 8th August. We are sorry to hear that her esteemed captain, Henry Forbes, is obliged to resign the command of her, in consequence of the illness with which he was attacked in the West Indies. The Daphne, 18, is commissioned at the Eastward, by Captain J. J. Onslow. The Resistance, trooper, Commander Patey, arrived this afternoon from Quebec, last from Cork, where she disembarked the 56th Regiment, from Quebec. The Resistance will proceed again to Quebec, with the reserve battalion of the 71st Regiment, now stationed at Chichester. The Sulphur, surveying vessel, Captain Belcher, will be paid off at Woolwich on Tuesday next, Salamander, Columbia, Avon, Dee, and Rhadamanthus; and nearly ready for sea, Comet, Meteor, African, Bee, and Rocket. The ship George the Fourth is taking in 400 tons of bread, at Spithead, for China, with which she will proceed, after landing the St. Helena corps, at that Island.

=========================

AN AQUATIC PROCESSION. -- ENNISKILLEN PETTY SESSIONS, July 25. On the case for hearing wherein a number of young men were charged with sailing on the lake as an "Orange procession," on the 12th instant, being called on, John Collum, Esq., solicitor, said that a letter had been received in Enniskillen from the Castle, requiring the prosecution of those young men, and he thought it but right that the report sent from this town, upon which Mr. Brewster had advised the present course, should be laid before the magistrates. Mr. Knaresborough -- I suppose you allude to me, but I can assure you I had nothing to do in the matter. I barely transmitted the proper police report. Messrs. Collum and Dane, declared the report to Government a fair and correct one. After the examination of Head-constable Nolan, Mr. Collum said he had great respect for the Attorney-General, but the magistrates were on their oaths, and had the power in their discretion to refuse taking information for which there were no grounds. He did not consent to give Mr. Blackburne an opportunity, should he choose, in those days of expediency, to exercise what was modestly called even-handed justice, by sending his clients to trial, at great inconvenience and expense, charged with a crime they utterly disclaimed. The case was dismissed, Mr. Knaresborough, R.M., we hear, registering his dissent from the decision on the Petty Sessions record.

=========================

DRUMBO AND DRUMBEG FARMING SOCIETY.

On Wednesday, the annual show of this Society for the present year was held at Finaghy, near Dunmurry. The cattle were of superior quality and appearance. The Society is in a healthy state, and has already produced a very detailed improvement in the agriculture and cattle-breeding of the district which its operations embrace.

The annual dinner of the members took place in Mrs. Carmichael's Inn, Dunmurry -- the Rev. Dr. Montgomery, President of the Society, in the chair, and John Charley, Esq. bf Finaghy, acting as croupier. The decisions of the judges, which were as follow, gave universal satisfaction:--

Amateur Class. -- Aged Bulls. -- Hugh Montgomery, Esq. Ballydrain, was adjudged the medal.

Two-Year-Old Bulls. -- David Blizard, first prize.

Cows. -- Mr. Montgomery, first; Mr. W. Stevenson, jun., second.

Two-Tear-Old Heifers. -- Mr. W. Stevenson, first; Mr. John Charley, second.

Yearlings. -- Dr. Montgomery, first.

Calves under 8 Months. -- Mr. Jonathan Richardson, Glenmore, first.

Breeding Sows. -- Mr. Hugh Montgomery, first; Mr. W. Stevenson, second.

Rams. -- Mr. Jonathan Richardson, Glenmore, first.

Farmers Class. -- Three-Year-Old Bulls. -- No competition.

Two-Tear-Old Bulls. -- Alexander M'Dowell, first prize.

One-Year Old Bulls. -- No prize, from want of merit.

Cows. -- William Brown, first, and William Brown, second.

Two-Year-Old Heifers. -- Samuel Snowden, first.

One-Year-Old Heifers. -- William Brown, first.

Calves. -- William Brown, first.

Boars. -- John M'Dowell, first.

=========================

Shipping Intelligence.

PORT OF BELFAST.

DEPARTURES OF STEAMERS.

For Liverpool, the Athlone, Davies, on Tuesday, August 9, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Greenock and Glasgow, the Tartar, Stewart, this day at 5 o'clock evening.

For Greenock and Glasgow, the Aurora, Anderson, on Monday, August 10, at ten o'clock night.

For Dublin, the Birmingham, Church, on Wednesday, August 10, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Stranraer, the Maid of Galway, Haswell, on Tuesday, August 9, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Whitehaven, the Earl of Lonsdale, Thompson, on Wednesday, August 10, at eleven o'clock morning.

For Carlisle, the Antelope, Macpherson, on Tuesday, August 9, at nine o'clock night.

For Liverpool, from Portrush, calling at Larne, &c., the Coleraine, Johnstone, on Thursday, August 11, at nine o'clock morning.

For Liverpool, from Warrenpoint, the Hercules, Tallan, to-morrow evening at eight o'clock.

SAILINGS OUTWARDS.

The brig Rebecca of Belfast, Bracegirdle, sailed from Demerara for Barbadoes June 7.

The barque Agitator of Belfast, Henry, sailed from Liverpool for Miramichi 30th ultimo.

The brig Morgiana of Belfast, Carrie, sailed hence on Tuesday, for Prince Edward's Island, with goods and passengers.

The barque Plutus, Aymar, of and from St. Andrew, N.B., sailed hence on Tuesday.

The Britannia steamer, Hewitt, sailed from Liverpool for Halifax and Boston yesterday.

The Londonderry, Hatrick, sailed from Derry for St. John, N.B., previous to 1st instant.

The Eliza Ann, Bell, sailed from Liverpool for Kingston, Jamaica, 2d instant.

SAILINGS INWARDS.

The Star of Belfast, Martin, from Marseilles to Plymouth, sailed from Gibraltar 14th ultimo.

The schooner Ulster of Belfast, Drennan, sailed from Madeira 19th ultimo.

The Success, M'Nally, sailed from Chepstow for this port 27th ultimo.

ARRIVALS OUTWARDS.

The barque Charles of Stornoway, M'Lea, master, hence to New York, has arrived after a passage of thirty-six days; passengers and crew all well.

The brig' Parrsboro' of Belfast, Hetherington, hence at Demerara, June 4.

The Royal Victoria of Belfast, M'Ferran, at Cardiff from Waterford 30th ultimo.

The Unity, Williams, from Cardiff to Belfast put into Milford 29th ultimo.

The Charlotte, Williams, from Cardiff to Belfast put into Milford 29th ultimo.

The Isabella, Elliot, and Argyle, Jones, hence at Penrhyn, Bangor, 30th ultimo.

The Martha, Evans, from Cardiff to Newry put into Milford 20th ultimo.

The brig Amelia, Crosby, at New York from Newry July 5; passengers and crew all well.

The Lagan, Thompson, hence to London, at Deal on 30th ultimo.

ARRIVALS INWARDS.

Arrived on Monday, the British Queen, Tilley, from Miramichi, with a cargo of timber and deals.

The St. Martins of Newry, Vaughan, at Newry from St. John, N.B., 29th ultimo.

The Sir George Prevost, Savage, at Newry from Quebec 29th ultimo.

ENTERED FOR LOADING.

Loading at Liverpool for China, the ship Gondolier of Belfast, Oliver.

Loading at Liverpool for Port Philip and Sydney, N.S.W., the Thomas Hughes of Belfast, Butler.

Loading at Liverpool for Vera Cruz, the Ponningham of Belfast, Green.

CASUALTIES.

The schooner Venus, of Portaferry, which had been sunk in a squall some weeks ago, entering Killybegs Bay, has now, by great exertion, been brought near the shore at the Rough Point. On Saturday week, as the men were engaged in bailing out the water, the tackling having given way, she got a list to seaward, capsizing all hands; a few gentlemen, who were looking on at the time, were obligd to swim to the beach, to save themselves from their perilous position. -- Derry Standard.

WRECK ON THE COAST OF CONNEMARA. -- A few days ago a vessel was seen off the harbour of Buffin Island, on this coast, keel uppermost. She was towed into that harbour by the boats and inhabitants of the island; her cargo was taken out through the stowage ports, and landed on the island. It consisted of about 30,000 oak staves, from five to six feet long, four and a-half to six inches broad, and from two and a-half to six inches thick. She now lies stranded, keel uppermost; her cabin, forecastle, &c., have not yet been opened, nor have any of her papers been found. She appears to be quite new, as if on her first voyage, about 400 tons burden, and apparently about six months waterlogged. I have not had any trace of where she is from. Connemara, July 27, 1842. -- Correspondent of the Freeman's Journal.

LONDONDERRY, July 18. -- The ship Heroine, Walker, of and for Aberdeen, from Quebec, put into this river water-logged; the master is engaging hands to pump the vessel round to Aberdeen.

ST. JOHN, N.B., July 14. -- The Brutus, Gourlay, of Greenock, from Port Rico, for this port, was cast away on the southwest head of Grand Manan, in the fog, on the 6th instant. The crew had much difficulty in getting on shore; vessel and cargo totally lost.

The Morning Star, Walker, from Mayaguez for Halifax went on shore at Duncan's Reef; a total loss; crew saved.

QUEBEC, July 4. -- The Star, Lincoln, from Newcastle for Quebec, was abandoned at sea, and the crew picked up by the brig Britannia, from London, and brought to Saguenay. Captain Lincoln arrived here yesterday morning in the barque Endyman, having been taken on board at Green Island.

ST. ANDREW, N.B., July 8. -- The Ada, from St. Vincent, got on shore, at the Ledge 6th instant, and is expected to become a wreck.

QUEBEC, July 9. -- The Charlevoix, in proceeding down the river, got aground at Sorel; mail and passengers taken off by the British American (steamer), arrived here.

MARSEILLES, July 29. -- The wreck of a ship's keel, upwards, almost new, apparently of foreign build, about 300 or 400 tons burden, was passed 18th instant, in lat. 47 21 N., long. 70 22 W., by the General Carrol, arrived in the Loire.

NEW YORK, July 15. -- The barque Nesbit, of London, has been found ashore on the west end of the Caicos bilged and abandoned; a wrecker had arrived at Turk's Island with a chronometer, ladies' apparel, &c., taken from the wreck.

DEAL, July 30. -- The wreck of a ship, about 500 tons, totally dismasted, apparently of North American build, was passed on the 24th instant in lat. 51, long. 10, by the Anglesea, arrived in the Downs.

PLYMOUTH, July 30. -- The Sarah sloop, from Liverpool, with salt and flour, was lost last night on the rocks near the stays; crew saved.

Sailed from Southampton, 30th ult., the Lady Mary Wood steamer, for Gibraltar.

GIBRALTAR, July 21. -- Her Majesty's steamer Geyser arrived here from Portsmouth, took fire on the 18th, which was fortunately extinguished, and proceeded on the 19th to Malta.

BUENOS AYRES, May 27. -- The Oriental, arrived here from Liverpool, had a narrow escape from being destroyed by fire at sea. A cask of sulphuric acid is supposed to have become spontaneously ignited, and an immense quantity of water was poured into the hold, which, it is feared, has occasioned considerable damage to the cargo.

Jabez, Stevenson, from Glasgow, for Liverpool, at Donaghadee, after being on shore, but without damage.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

NOTICE TO MARINERS. -- ST. PETERSBURG, July 6. -- The two beacons formerly placed on the western shore of the island Mudjuga, and marked the extreme margin of the Brobhcar (Berken baar), of the Dwins, have been removed much further southward, in order to mark the direction which the channel takes. The first beacon, nearest the shore, with two black balls on the top of it, is situated at 13 15 2 wersts, 60 fathoms S.E.; and the other, with only one black ball, at 16 30 2 wersts, 152 fathoms S.E. from the lighthouse. Their present distance is 92 fathoms from N.W. to S.E., and their altitude, from the base, 91 feet above the level of the sea; but at the usual state of the water, 101 feet above the level of the sea.

EXPECTED NEW BEACON IN THE PENTLAND FRITH. -- THURSO, July 27. -- The Skerry off the Island of Stroma (Pentland Frith) has been surveyed with the view to the erection thereon of a beacon.

CAUTION TO MARINERS. -- SUNKEN ROCK OR WRECK. -- The Pearl, from Nantes to Falmouth, was assisted into Scilly, and ran on the beach at St. Mary's, being very leaky, having struck on a sunken rock or wreck about fifty miles from Pambœuf Hedic Island, being N.E. ½ E., distant three miles.

CAUTION TO MARINERS -- SUNKEN ROCK OFF THE CAPE DE VERDS. -- Lloyd's Agent thus writes:-- "Bonavista, Cape de Verds, July 4, 1842, -- I have the honour to report, for the information of the underwriters at Lloyd's, that the steamer Phoenix, Emanuel Harrington, master, bound to the Cape of Good Hope, put into Porto Praya, in great distress, having touched upon a shoal at the north-east point of this Island on the 23th ultimo, at half-past ten at night, supposed distance from land twenty-two or twenty-three miles, and in lat. 16 19 N., and long 22 26 W. It is also supposed to be the Sunbeam Shoal, upon which the Charlotte was lost in April last year. The Phœnix, at the time of the Shipping Intelligence.

PORT OF BELFAST.

DEPARTURES OF STEAMERS.

For Liverpool, the Athlone, Davies, on Tuesday, August 9, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Greenock and Glasgow, the Tartar, Stewart, this day at 5 o'clock evening.

For Greenock and Glasgow, the Aurora, Anderson, on Monday, August 10, at ten o'clock night.

For Dublin, the Birmingham, Church, on Wednesday, August 10, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Stranraer, the Maid of Galway, Haswell, on Tuesday, August 9, at twelve o'clock noon.

For Whitehaven, the Earl of Lonsdale, Thompson, on Wednesday, August 10, at eleven o'clock morning.

For Carlisle, the Antelope, Macpherson, on Tuesday, August 9, at nine o'clock night.

For Liverpool, from Portrush, calling at Larne, &c., the Coleraine, Johnstone, on Thursday, August 11, at nine o'clock morning.

For Liverpool, from Warrenpoint, the Hercules, Tallan, to-morrow evening at eight o'clock.

SAILINGS OUTWARDS.

The brig Rebecca of Belfast, Bracegirdle, sailed from Demerara for Barbadoes June 7.

The barque Agitator of Belfast, Henry, sailed from Liverpool for Miramichi 30th ultimo.

The brig Morgiana of Belfast, Carrie, sailed hence on Tuesday, for Prince Edward's Island, with goods and passengers.

The barque Plutus, Aymar, of and from St. Andrew, N.B., sailed hence on Tuesday.

The Britannia steamer, Hewitt, sailed from Liverpool for Halifax and Boston yesterday.

The Londonderry, Hatrick, sailed from Derry for St. John, N.B., previous to 1st instant.

The Eliza Ann, Bell, sailed from Liverpool for Kingston, Jamaica, 2d instant.

SAILINGS INWARDS.

The Star of Belfast, Martin, from Marseilles to Plymouth, sailed from Gibraltar 14th ultimo.

The schooner Ulster of Belfast, Drennan, sailed from Madeira 19th ultimo.

The Success, M'Nally, sailed from Chepstow for this port 27th ultimo.

ARRIVALS OUTWARDS.

The barque Charles of Stornoway, M'Lea, master, hence to New York, has arrived after a passage of thirty-six days; passengers and crew all well.

The brig' Parrsboro' of Belfast, Hetherington, hence at Demerara, June 4.

The Royal Victoria of Belfast, M'Ferran, at Cardiff from Waterford 30th ultimo.

The Unity, Williams, from Cardiff to Belfast put into Milford 29th ultimo.

The Charlotte, Williams, from Cardiff to Belfast put into Milford 29th ultimo.

The Isabella, Elliot, and Argyle, Jones, hence at Penrhyn, Bangor, 30th ultimo.

The Martha, Evans, from Cardiff to Newry put into Milford 20th ultimo.

The brig Amelia, Crosby, at New York from Newry July 5; passengers and crew all well.

The Lagan, Thompson, hence to London, at Deal on 30th ultimo.

ARRIVALS INWARDS.

Arrived on Monday, the British Queen, Tilley, from Miramichi, with a cargo of timber and deals.

The St. Martins of Newry, Vaughan, at Newry from St. John, N.B., 29th ultimo.

The Sir George Prevost, Savage, at Newry from Quebec 29th ultimo.

ENTERED FOR LOADING.

Loading at Liverpool for China, the ship Gondolier of Belfast, Oliver.

Loading at Liverpool for Port Philip and Sydney, N.S.W., the Thomas Hughes of Belfast, Butler.

Loading at Liverpool for Vera Cruz, the Ponningham of Belfast, Green.

CASUALTIES.

The schooner Venus, of Portaferry, which had been sunk in a squall some weeks ago, entering Killybegs Bay, has now, by great exertion, been brought near the shore at the Rough Point. On Saturday week, as the men were engaged in bailing out the water, the tackling having given way, she got a list to seaward, capsizing all hands; a few gentlemen, who were looking on at the time, were obligd to swim to the beach, to save themselves from their perilous position. -- Derry Standard.

WRECK ON THE COAST OP CONNEMARA. -- A few days ago a vessel was seen off the harbour of Buffin Island, on this coast, keel uppermost. She was towed into that harbour by the boats and inhabitants of the island; her cargo was taken out through the stowage ports, and landed on the island. It consisted of about 30,000 oak staves, from five to six feet long, four and a-half to six inches broad, and from two and a-half to six inches thick. She now lies stranded, keel uppermost; her cabin, forecastle, &c., have not yet been opened, nor have any of her papers been found. She appears to be quite new, as if on her first voyage, about 400 tons burden, and apparently about six months waterlogged. I have not had any trace of where she is from. Connemara, July 27, 1842. -- Correspondent of the Freeman's Journal.

LONDONDERRY, July 18. -- The ship Heroine, Walker, of and for Aberdeen, from Quebec, put into this river water-logged; the master is engaging hands to pump the vessel round to Aberdeen.

ST. JOHN, N.B., July 14. -- The Brutus, Gourlay, of Greenock, from Port Rico, for this port, was cast away on the southwest head of Grand Manan, in the fog, on the 6th instant. The crew had much difficulty in getting on shore; vessel and cargo totally lost.

The Morning Star, Walker, from Mayaguez for Halifax went on shore at Duncan's Reef; a total loss; crew saved.

QUEBEC, July 4. -- The Star, Lincoln, from Newcastle for Quebec, was abandoned at sea, and the crew picked up by the brig Britannia, from London, and brought to Saguenay. Captain Lincoln arrived here yesterday morning in the barque Endyman, having been taken on board at Green Island.

ST. ANDREW, N.B., July 8. -- The Ada, from St. Vincent, got on shore, at the Ledge 6th instant, and is expected to become a wreck.

QUEBEC, July 9. -- The Charlevoix, in proceeding down the river, got aground at Sorel; mail and passengers taken off by the British American (steamer), arrived here.

MARSEILLES, July 29. -- The wreck of a ship's keel, upwards, almost new, apparently of foreign build, about 300 or 400 tons burden, was passed 18th instant, in lat. 47 21 N., long. 70 22 W., by the General Carrol, arrived in the Loire.

NEW YORK, July 15. -- The barque Nesbit, of London, has been found ashore on the west end of the Caicos bilged and abandoned; a wrecker had arrived at Turk's Island with a chronometer, ladies' apparel, &c., taken from the wreck.

DEAL, July 30. -- The wreck of a ship, about 500 tons, totally dismasted, apparently of North American build, was passed on the 24th instant in lat. 51, long. 10, by the Anglesea, arrived in the Downs.

PLYMOUTH, July 30. -- The Sarah sloop, from Liverpool, with salt and flour, was lost last night on the rocks near the stays; crew saved.

Sailed from Southampton, 30th ult., the Lady Mary Wood steamer, for Gibraltar.

GIBRALTAR, July 21. -- Her Majesty's steamer Geyser arrived here from Portsmouth, took fire on the 18th, which was fortunately extinguished, and proceeded on the 19th to Malta.

BUENOS AYRES, May 27. -- The Oriental, arrived here from Liverpool, had a narrow escape from being destroyed by fire at sea. A cask of sulphuric acid is supposed to have become spontaneously ignited, and an immense quantity of water was poured into the hold, which, it is feared, has occasioned considerable damage to the cargo.

Jabez, Stevenson, from Glasgow, for Liverpool, at Donaghadee, after being on shore, but without damage.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

NOTICE TO MARINERS. -- ST. PETERSBURG, July 6. -- The two beacons formerly placed on the western shore of the island Mudjuga, and marked the extreme margin of the Brobhcar (Berken baar), of the Dwins, have been removed much further southward, in order to mark the direction which the channel takes. The first beacon, nearest the shore, with two black balls on the top of it, is situated at 13 15 2 wersts, 60 fathoms S.E.; and the other, with only one black ball, at 16 30 2 wersts, 152 fathoms S.E. from the lighthouse. Their present distance is 92 fathoms from N.W. to S.E., and their altitude, from the base, 91 feet above the level of the sea; but at the usual state of the water, 101 feet above the level of the sea.

EXPECTED NEW BEACON IN THE PENTLAND FRITH. -- THURSO, July 27. -- The Skerry off the Island of Stroma (Pentland Frith) has been surveyed with the view to the erection thereon of a beacon.

CAUTION TO MARINERS. -- SUNKEN ROCK OR WRECK. -- The Pearl, from Nantes to Falmouth, was assisted into Scilly, and ran on the beach at St. Mary's, being very leaky, having struck on a sunken rock or wreck about fifty miles from Pambœuf Hedic Island, being N.E. ½ E., distant three miles.

CAUTION TO MARINERS -- SUNKEN ROCK OFF THE CAPE DE VERDS. -- Lloyd's Agent thus writes:-- "Bonavista, Cape de Verds, July 4, 1842, -- I have the honour to report, for the information of the underwriters at Lloyd's, that the steamer Phoenix, Emanuel Harrington, master, bound to the Cape of Good Hope, put into Porto Praya, in great distress, having touched upon a shoal at the north-east point of this Island on the 23th ultimo, at half-past ten at night, supposed distance from land twenty-two or twenty-three miles, and in lat. 16 19 N., and long 22 26 W. It is also supposed to be the Sunbeam Shoal, upon which the Charlotte was lost in April last year. The Phœnix, at the time of the accident, was under sail without steam, and drew eleven feet forward and twelve and a-half feet aft, and the place injured is at the after part of the keel, and there being but little or no swell of the sea; these facts, demonstrate that the shoal in question has more than eleven feet over it. The Phœnix came here from St. Jago for further repairs and a supply of coals, which has been obtained, and now proceeds to England to make good the damages sustained. The Phœnix has since arrived at Cowes.

IMMENSE STEAM VESSEL. -- The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have ordered Mr. Oliver Lang, master shipwright of the Woolwich dockyard, to submit a plan of a steam-vessel of 1,650 tons burthen, and suitable for engines of 800 horse power, with a crew of 300 men. To convey some idea of the magnitude of a vessel of 1,650 tons burthen, propelled, by engines of 800 horse power, it may be observed, that the largest first-class steam frigates at present in the British Navy, the Geyser, Devastation, and several others, do not exceed about 1,000 tons, and 400 horse power, and that the Penelope 42-gun frigate, at present being converted into a steam vessel, by being lengthened sixty feet will only be fitted, with engines of 650 horse power.accident, was under sail without steam, and drew eleven feet forward and twelve and a-half feet aft, and the place injured is at the after part of the keel, and there being but little or no swell of the sea; these facts, demonstrate that the shoal in question has more than eleven feet over it. The Phœnix came here from St. Jago for further repairs and a supply of coals, which has been obtained, and now proceeds to England to make good the damages sustained. The Phœnix has since arrived at Cowes.

IMMENSE STEAM VESSEL. -- The Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty have ordered Mr. Oliver Lang, master shipwright of the Woolwich dockyard, to submit a plan of a steam-vessel of 1,650 tons burthen, and suitable for engines of 800 horse power, with a crew of 300 men. To convey some idea of the magnitude of a vessel of 1,650 tons burthen, propelled, by engines of 800 horse power, it may be observed, that the largest first-class steam frigates at present in the British Navy, the Geyser, Devastation, and several others, do not exceed about 1,000 tons, and 400 horse power, and that the Penelope 42-gun frigate, at present being converted into a steam vessel, by being lengthened sixty feet will only be fitted, with engines of 650 horse power.

 

^ top of page

The Banner of Ulster - 30 August 1842

Births

On the 21st instant, the Lady of the Rev. David Reid, Presbyterian Minister at Dunfanaghy, of a Daughter.

Marriages

On the 17th instant, in the Friends' Meeting-house, Lurgan, HENRY NEELE of Roscrea, county Tipperary, Esq., to SARAH SOPHIA, youngest daughter of JAmes Turtle of Tonnamore Lodge, county Armagh, Esq.

On the 13th instant, by the Rev. David Adams, Ahoghill, Mr. THOMAS MOORE, third son of the late Mr. Robert Moore, to ANNE, eldest daughter of Mr. Alexander Moody, both of Ballynafle, county Antrim.

On the 17th instant, by the Rev. A. Breaky, Killyleagh, Captain JAMES M'CONNELL, of the brig Unces, New Orleans, to UPHEMIA, third daughter of Mr. James M'Cann, of Killyleagh.

August 24, in Hillsborough Church, by the Venerable the Archdeacon of Down, the Rev. JAMES FORD, to JANE LUCY, second daughter of William Edmund Reilly, Esq.

Deaths

On the 19th instant, at North Brook Lodge, near Exeter, Devonshire, the Marchioness Dowager of HEADFORT, aged eighty-four.

On the 22d inst., at the residence of his father, ROBERT, second son of Mr. Robert Stewart, Dromore.

On the 14th instant, in Captain Street, Coleraine, aged sixty-six years, Paymaster Sergeant WILLIAM HENDERSON, late of the 86th Foot.

At Ardrossan, on the 16th inst., ELLEN, the beloved wife of Major Martin, second daughter of the late Hugh Lyle, of Jackson Hall, Coleraine, Esq.

On the 19th instant, at his father's residence, Maghera, Mr. John Taylor, late of Belfast, after a short illness.

On the 20th instant, at Ramelton, in the sixty-third year of her age, Miss CATHERINE REID, only surviving sister of the late Rev. E. Reid, of that town, and of the Rev. Dr. Reid, of Glasgow College, much and deservedly regretted by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

On the 20th instant, suddenly, at Magherafelt, Mr. BENJAMIN BEATTY, teacher.

August 20, at Edinburgh, the Right Honourable Francis Lord Gray, of Gray, in his seventy-seventh year.

August 22, at his residence, Fitzwilliam Square, Dublin, Sir Joshua Christmas Paul, Ballyglan, in the county of Wexford, and of Paulville, in the county Carlow, Bart.

At the house of her daughter, in this town, on the 23d instant, in her eightieth year, MARY, relict of the late Mr. John M'Court, formerly of Templepatrick.

August 24, at Coleraine, in the fourth year of his age, of water on the brain, SAMUEL KNOX, youngest son of the Rev. D. Flynn, 12, Harcourt Street.

At Waringstown, on the 24th instant, of rapid decline, SALLY, daughter of the late Surgeon Lutton, in the twenty-seventh year of her age.

On the 25th instant, at Cave Hill Cottage, Mr. WILLIAM MACAULEY.

On the 28th instant, at the house of her son, MARY BELL, relict of the late John Bell, of this town, merchant.

Suddenly, at Port Philip, New South Wales, in March last, Captain PHILIP GROVE BEERS, of her Majesty's 80th Regiment, son of the late W. Beers, Esq., of Ballward Lodge, county Down.

Clippings

IRISH BANKRUPTS.-- Michael Caulfield and Andrew Caulfield, of Athy, in the county of Kildare, shop-keepers, dealers, and chapmen, to surrender on the 7th September, and on the 7th of October. Martin Costello, of Tuam, in the county of Galway, shop-keeper, dealer, and chapman, to surrender on the 7th of September, and on the 7th of October.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

PORT OF BELFAST.

ARRIVED, August 24.-- Falcon (steamer), Gowan, Liverpool, goods and passengers; Elizabeth, M'Ferran, Bangor, slates.-- 25. Aurora (steamer), Anderson, Glasgow, goods and passengers; Glasgow (steamer), Williams, Glasgow, ballast.

SAILED, August 24.-- Marys, Murphy, Bridport, wood; Ruby, Rodgers, Larne, wheat; Commodore (steamer), Hardie, Glasgow, goods and passengers; Birmingham (steamer), Church, Dublin, goods and passengers.-- 25. Falcon (steamer), Gowan, Liverpool, goods and passengers.

DEPARTURES OF STEAMERS.

For Greenock and Glasgow, the Aurora, Anderson, to-morrow, at three o'clock, afternoon.

For Dublin, the Birmingham, Church, to-morrow, at four o'clock, afternoon.

For Stranraer, the Maid of Galloway, Haswell, to-day, at seven o'clock, morning.

For Whitehaven, the Countess of Lonsdale, Lamb, to-morrow, at four o'clock, afternoon.

For Liverpool, the Reindeer, Head, on Thursday, at five o'clock, evening.

For Carlisle, the Antelope, Macpherson, to-day, at two o'clock, afternoon.

For Liverpool, from Portrush, calling at Larne, &c., the Coleraine, Johnstone, on Thursday, September 1, at nine o'clock, morning.

For Liverpool, from Warrenpoint, the Hercules, Tallan, to-morrow, at four o'clock, afternoon.

For Halifax and Boston, from Liverpool, the Acadia, Ryrie, on 4th September.

For New York, from Liverpool, the Great Western, Hosken, on Saturday, 3d September.

ARRIVALS INWARDS.

At Larne, on 26th instant, the schooner Jessie Scott, of Inverkeithing, M'Culloch, from Dantzic, with a cargo of wheat, in thirty days. During the passage, nothing but S.W. gales prevailed. Since she was launched in December last, this is the third voyage she has made from the Baltic.

ARRIVALS OUTWARDS.

The brig Chamcook, of Belfast, Poag, at Constantinople, from Newcastle, 3d instant.

The Sluice, Francis, from Meolfra, to this port, at Holyhead, 22d instant.

The brig Sir A. N. M'Nab, of Belfast, Press, at North Shields, from Liverpool, 22d instant.

The brig Joseph P. Dobree, of Belfast, Hawkins, at Liverpool, from St. Petersburg, 23d instant.

At Holyhead, the Upton, Pritchards, from Beaumaris for Belfast.

At Holyhead, the Adventure, Jones, from Uxbridge, for Belfast.

The following vessels, from Liverpool, have arrived at New York:-- Cambridge, Barstow; Sea, Delano; Athens, Chase; Roscoe, Huttleston; Swanton, Heath; Echo, Sill; Metoka, M'Laren; Huron, Cameron.

The Martha, from Liverpool, at St. Thomas and Puerto Cabello.

DONEGALL, August 24.-- The Ann, O'Brien, had a fine run from Quebec of twenty-six days; reports the Springhill, Wilson, from Donegall, with emigrants, had arrived three days before she sailed. Not many ships at Quebec when the Ann sailed.

SAILINGS INWARDS.

The Mayflower, Pool, and John Lloyd, Mitchell, sailed from Cardiff, for Belfast, 22d instant.

CLEARED.

At London, the Glenswilly, M'Neil, for Port Philip.

LOADING.

At Glasgow, the brig Sophia, of Belfast, for Monte Video and Buenos Ayres.

CASUALTIES.

NEW YORK, August 6.-- The Salem, Ilsley, from Liverpool, was on shore below Mobile, but expected to be got off after discharging her cargo.

ARCHANGEL, August 3.-- The Marquis of Douro, Allen, hence to London, went ashore on Knock Sand, in the White Sea, during a fog, but floated off, nearly full of water, and ran ashore on the Lapland coast.

-- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

MILITARY AND NAVAL AFFAIRS.

The Army.

PROMOTIONS AND EXCHANGES.

War Office, August 19

15th Regiment of Light Dragoons.-- Lieutenant Francis Woodley Horne to be Captain, by purchase, vice the Viscount Amiens, who retires; Cornet Herbert Morgan to be Lieutenant, by purchase, vice Horne.

16th Regiment of Foot.-- Brevet Major James Brand to be Major., without purchase, vice Dalzell, who retires upon full pay; Lieutenant John Bruce to be Captain, vice Brand; Ensign Charles Armstrong to be Lieutenant, vice Bruce; Alexander Cockburn M'Barnet, gent., to be Ensign, vice Armstrong.

17th.-- Ensign John Ballard Gardiner, from the 69th Foot, to be Lieutenant, without purchase, vice Butler, whose promotion has been cancelled.

18th.-- Frederick Lillie, gent., to be Ensign, without purchase, vice Kirk, cashiered by sentence of a general court martial.

28th.-- Ensign Percy Archer Butler to be Lieutenant, by purchase, vice Lake, deceased.

61st.-- Ensign Chas. Edward Prime to be Lieutenant, by purchase, vice Coryton, who retires; Ensign John Fortescue Brickdale to be Lieutenant, by purchase, vice Gib, who retires; Edward Thomas Wickham, gent., to be Ensign, by purchase, vice Prime; William Hudson, gent., to be Ensign, by purchase, vice Brickdale.

62d.-- Captain E. W. Sibley, from half-pay unattached, to be Captain, vice James Sweeny, who exchanges.

69th.-- Corporal-Major William Griffin Sutton, from the Royal Regiment of Horse Guards, to be Ensign, without purchase, vice Gardiner, promoted in the 17th Foot.

83d.-- Thomas Stewart Lane, gent., to be Ensign, without purchase, vice Maxwell, promoted in the 2d West India Regiment.

92d.-- Ensign Patrick Bruce Junor to be Lieutenant, by purchase, vice Cochrane, who retires; Francis Nicholl, gent., to be Ensign, by purchase, vice Junor.

95th.-- Lieutenant Wm. Armstrong Rogers to be Captain, without purchase, vice Saunders, deceased.

2d West India Regiment.-- Ensign and Adjutant John Harpur to have the rank of Lieutenant; Ensign William Augustus Riddell Maxwell, from the 83d Foot, to be Lieutenant, without purchase, vice R. M. Nicholls, appointed to the 25th Foot.

3d West India Regiment.-- To be Lieutenants, without purchase -- Ensign Charles Graves; Ensign Geo. Cockburn Urmston. To be Ensigns, without purchase -- Angus M'Tarrgart, gent., vice Graves; Wm. Hunt Carr, gent., vice Urmston.

UNATTACHED.-- Lieutenant E. W. Sibbey, from the 26th Foot, to be Captain, without purchase, vice Rogers, whose promotion has been cancelled.

BREVET.-- Major Wm. Johnstone, of the 26th Foot, to be Lieutenant in the Army.

The Navy.

We have heard that a hundred of the oldest Captains in the navy, not under sixty years of age, are to be allowed to retire, with the rank of Rear-Admiral, on 20s. per diem!

 

^ top of page