Larne Times - Saturday, 1 July 1916

Marriages

MORTON--DEMPSEY -- June 26th, 1916, at St. Patrick's Church, Cairncastle, by the Rev. C. H. L. Buchanan, M.A., William, eldest son of James Morton, to Hester Jane Ward, fifth daughter of Daniel Dempsey, both of Cairncastle.

M'CONNELL--M'CLEAN -- June 21st, 1916, at Carnmoney Presbyterian Church, by Rev. H. Waterworth, M.A., Albert Victor, youngest son of Thomas M'Connell, Dunboyne, Larne, to Elizabeth Williamson (Lillie), eldest daughter of the late Stafford and Mrs. M'Clean, Seaview, Glengormley. At home -- Colebrook, Larne, August3rd and 4th.

Death

SMITH -- June 22nd, 1916 (suddenly), at Glenganick, Scotland, James, third son of the late Robert Smith, of Ballycragie, Larne, aged 46 years.

For King and Country

STEELE -- May 24th, 1916, died of wounds received whilst in action, Private Hugh Steele, Royal Irish Fusiliers, third and dearly-beloved son of Mrs. Thomas Steele.
   He little thought his time so short,
      In this world to remain;
   Tho' when from home he went away
      Never to return again.
   No mother dear stood near him,
      To bid a last farewell;
   Not a loving word could he leave,
      To those he loved so well.
Deeply regretted by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters, and Brothers.

Clippings

The Editors Note-Book

With pleasure we record that Second-Lieutenant James Lennox Muir, of the 4t Batt. (attached 1st Batt.) Royal Irish Rifles, has been awarded the Military Cross, for distinguished conduct and devotion to duty in the field. Mr. Muir is the youngest son of the late Mr. G. A. J. Muir, M.R.C.V.S., Larne, and a brother of Rev. R. R. Muir, B.A. formerly vicar of Saintfield, and now of Glenavy. He was educated at Larne Grammar School, and when the war broke out was a student in the Faculty of Arts at Queen's University, Belfast, of the O.T.C., of which he was a member for two years. He received a commission in the North Downs in October, 1914, and went to the front from Carrickfergus a few months ago. Second-Lietuenant Muir will have the heartiest congratulations of his many Larne friends upon gaining the much-coveted decoration.

-- -- -- -- --

An Army order issued on Saturday states that it has been decided, subject to certain conditions, that the issue of a separation allowance to the wife of a soldier in respect of her husband shall not preclude the issue of an allowance in respect of a soldier son who also contributed to the support of the household which includes brothers and sisters who benefited by his contribution.

-- -- -- -- --

We understand that Captain A. C. Taggart, who is adjutant of a battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, has been wounded in several places by shrapnel, but fortunately not seriously, and though full particulars are not to hand it is understood that, he was able to continue on duty.

-- -- -- -- --

The Department of Agriculture consider it opportune to remind farmers of the importance of taking up the work of dealing with harmful weeds at the very first available opportunity. Not only are such weeds unsightly and injurious, but in view of the need for the maximum food production it is essential that they should not be allowed to take the place of useful food or forage plants. Over the greater part of Ireland certain weeds have now been systematically destroyed for a number of years, and it should be the aim of all occupiers of land to do their part in maintaining and extending the improvement already effected. The farmer who is careless in this respect would do well to recognise the injure which his negligence causes to his neighbours. The occupier of land who fails to cut weeds is liable to a fine of 5, and as a matter of fact this penalty was imposed last year by a petty sessions court.

-- -- -- -- --

When the industrial development of Larne is spoken of thoughts naturally turn to those large and prosperous industries which have been established here during the past quarter of a century, but it is worth remembering that there are nourishing places of business in the town working with renewed vigour after fifty or sixty years of vicissitudes. Such a one is the works of the Larne Mineral Water Company. A few weeks ago a Belfast contemporary published a special page dealing with the mineral water trade in the city, and mention was made of the suitability of the local water for the manufacture. Those remarks apply with equal emphasis to the water from the Sallagh springs which forms the Larne public supply, and good judges have repeatedly testified to the unique and valuable properties of the water for the manufacture of lemonade and kindred drinks.

-- -- -- -- --

During the past few weeks the Larne Mineral Water Company's works (now owned by the well-known Larne firm -- John Crawford, wine and spirit merchant) have been moved "lock, stock, and barrel" to conveniently-situated premises adjoining the premises of Mr. William Pinkerton, in Point Street. The previous history of the company goes back to the fifties, when Mr. William Perry (a brother-in-law of Mr. James B. Cuthbert, the present Shops Inspector) bought over some plant from a man named M'Cully, and carried on quite a lucrative business in the manufacture of mineral water in the house of his father-in-law -- a little farm which occupied the site now taken by the Towers at the foot of Tower Road. Then the business was moved up into Main Street, successively occupying premises now occupied by Mr. William Crawford and Mr. James Young. He was joined in business by his brother-in-law, Mr. John Crooks, who in time became the leading partner, and who in turn was succeeded by Mr. W. J. Crooks and his son, the late Mr. Cosgrove Crooks. In turn the Crooks family interest was acquired by Mr. Patrick Crawford and his son, the late Mr. John Crawford, and it is not too much to say that to-day the energy and enterprise shown in the conduct of the business augurs most favourably for success on a far greater scale than was ever contemplated by any of tho former owners.

-- -- -- -- --

Coincident with the removal to more convenient and commodious premises, the entire machinery of the business has been thoroughly overhauled, and, what is more important, perhaps, additions have been made which make the works one of the best (if not the best) equipped works in Ireland. Indeed, within it are ingenious and valuable labour-saving devices introduced for the first time to the kingdom, and the equipment and designing of the premises is without doubt a striking testimony to the knowledge and acumen of the manager, Mr. Samuel Craig, who possesses an invaluable knowledge of the trade at home and abroad. From first to last the manufacture is now entirely the work of the ingenious machines; inaccuracy or the risk of dirt is reduced to a minimum; and the enterprise of the management in concocting new drinks or improving old ones is made easy of accomplishment. The process from the well-equipped laboratory to the bottling and despatch department is a marvel of completeness, and it is quite safe to prophesy that the forethought and up-to-dateness of the management, combined with the thorough knowledge of local conditions, will have its due reward in the lucrative development of the industry.

-- -- -- -- --

In connection with the garden fete held at Oakfield, Carrickfergus, on the 10th inst., by the St. John Voluntary Aid Detachment 696, of which Mrs. J. L. M'Ferran is commandant, the sum of 251 8s was realised. 151 8s has been sent to the Prisoners of War Association, Kensington Palace, London, and 100 to Lady Richardson, the Old Town Hall, Belfast, for the benefit of Irish prisoners. Mrs. M'Ferran and the members of the detachment are to be congratulated on the success of their effort.

-- -- -- -- --

Women are turning out to be very successful as road sweepers. Here is our highly-esteemed friend, Mr H. P. Boulnois, stating in a paper at the Royal Sanitary Institute last week that they sweep them with that conscientiousness which is natural to them in their work, and do it as thoroughly as though it were their own backyard, whilst at the Ripon Rural District Council the surveyor said a woman employee was equal to any man they ever had, and a councillor said that they could not afford to keep a woman to sweep the roads, for they swept them so well that they swept them full of holes. ("Municipal Engineering.") Would it be possible to have a try in Larne? We fancy the majority of the residents would be quite content to risk the holes if only the dust (or mud in wot weather) was removed.

-- -- -- -- --

Without ostentation the work of the local Red Cross dejot geos on, and a full list of what has been done would surprise a great many people. Since the last reference in these columns, the following hospital supplies have been made and sent forward:-- To the British Red Cross Stores in London -- Thirty-four white flannel vests, 30 grey flannel day shirts, 26 stretcher cushions, 8 pairs of slippers, and 7 hot-water bottle covers. To Capt. Holden Carson, of the 15th Casualty Clearing Hospital, France -- Thirty-eight pyamas and various dressings. In addition there is also ready a large consignment of bed-jackets for despatch. Enlisting the aid and sympathy of all classes, the local depot is now the scene of a working party composed of young ladies in different business situations in the town. These ladies willingly give up one evening each week, and under the superintendence of Miss Essie Hill, Station Road, they have a already made ready for despatch to headquarters a huge quantity of hospital garments.

-- -- -- -- --

In connection with this noble work there is just one point on which emphasis might be laid. The public (as can be seen by our advertising columns to-day) have responded most generously to the appeals for funds, but there is urgent need for more workers. With plenty of materials and ample opportunities of rendering service it will not be to our credit if the supply of workers fails. Everyone can help, and there is no fee to be paid on joining a working party. The hours of work at the Laharna Hotel are -- On Monday and Friday mornings from 10.30 to 1.30. on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 2.30 to 5.30, and on Monday evenings from 7.30 to 9.30.

-- -- -- -- --

The importance of a knowledge of swimming and life-saving in the water is so obvious that it is gratifying to know that Miss Ruby Crawford of Inver Lodge, Larne, at the request of many friends, proposes to give lessons in this useful branch of education during the months of July and August. There is no one better qualified in the town to give such instruction as Miss Crawford, in addition to a local reputation holds the award of merit and a bronze medallion of the Life Saving Society, distinctions only gained by very severe tests. Miss Crawford will attend at the ladies' bathing stage to-morrow (Friday) morning to enrol names, and it is proposed in the two months to give about a dozen lessons in the water and an equal number on shore.

-- -- -- -- --

As will be seen in our advertising columns the Oriel Collegiate School, Larne, keeping up the school traditions, can lay claim to a gratifying list of recent successes in pianoforte playing at the examinations of the Associated Board of the Royal Academy of Music and the Royal College of Music, London. Awards have been gained in each of the divisions, and congratulations are due to the successful pupils, and particularly to the esteemed principals of the school, the Misses Starritt.

-- -- -- -- --

The results of scholarship examinations at the Larne Grammar School show that the three vacant scholarships have been secured by James M'Kay, Noel Wilson, and W. Whiteside -- all three pupils at Larne and Inver N.S. The possible number of marks was 450, and the boys mentioned successively obtained 365 359, and 333 marks.

=========================

NEW ZEALAND SOLDIER'S WILL.

A number of business men in Christchurch, New Zealand, were astonished to receive a couple of months ago payment in full for claims on a bankrupt's estate, the bankruptcy in question dating back about ten or twelve years. The explanation is interesting. The bankrupt's son, who was killed in action at the landing on Gallipoli, in his will provided for the payment of his father's creditors from his own estate. The son's action is all the more noteworthy in view of the fact that, in addition to the bankrupt having obtained his discharge, the money was no longer recoverable, owing to the operation of the Statute of Limitations.

=========================

Missing Relatives

NELSON -- Wanted to know the where abouts of William Edward Clarke Nelson eldest son of the late Joseph Nelson, watchmaker and Jeweller, Dromore, Co. Down, Ireland, last heard of in a jeweller's shop in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his sister, Mrs. Agnes Nelson Innis, 24 Hartington Street, Dublin Road, Belfast, Ireland. American and Australian papers please copy.

IRWINE -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of George Irwine. Last heard of about six years ago in Inverary, Loomoviap, Invereil, New South Wales. Any information concerning him will he thankfully received by his mother -- Mrs. George Irinne, Glenoe, Larne, Ireland. Australian papers please copy.

DARCUS -- Wanted to know the address of William Darcus, last heard of he was living in Sydney, Australia; carpenter by trade. Any information regarding him will be appreciated by his sister. -- Mary Morrison, 11 Fingal Street, Belfast, Ireland.

M'DONNELL -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Bella M'Donnell, aged about 20 years. Last heard of seven years ago, when she was residing in the Falls Road district of Belfast. Any information will be thankfully received by her sister, Miss Mary M'Donnell, c/o Forster Green Hospital, Belfast, Ireland.

M'ILWRATH -- Wanted to hear of Mary Ann M'Ilwrath, who left Belfast about 12 years ago for Canada. Heard of 8 years ago at Kelong, British Columbia. Information will be thankfully received by her brother, Rifleman James M'Ilwrath, C Co. 9th Batt. R.I. Rifles, British Expeditionary Force, France.

LUSK -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Anna Lusk (maiden name); last heard of about 30 years ago in New York. Her cousin, Mrs. Calvert, 116 Bryson Street, Belfast, Ireland, would be grateful for news about her.

MAXWELL -- Wanted to hear of Arthur or John Maxwell, formerly of Lisburn. Their brother, Robert Maxwell, of 500 Holden Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A., inquires.

HAMILTON -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of John Hamilton, formerly of Magheragall, Lisburn, who was last heard of four years ago in New York. Any information will be gratefully received by his sister, Miss Elizabeth Hamilton, 26 Winchester Street, Belfast, lreland.

JOHNSTON--GIBSON -- If this should meet the eye of Mrs. Andrew Gibson, formerly Annie Johnston, will she please communicate with her brother, Maurice Johnston, who will be glad to hear from her. Address Maurice Johnston, 48 Caselli Avenue, San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

GREENFIELD -- James (present age, 34), and Samuel (present age, 32), left Drummiller, near Gilford, for U.S.A. in summer of 1903. James, when last heard from, was in New York, and Samuel in Alleghenny, Pa. Present address desired by brother, Robert Henry, c/o 13 Newry Street, Banbridge, Co. Down.

M'AVOY -- Wanted to hear of Daniel M'Avoy. Last heard of thirty years ago at St Heliers, Jersey, Channel Islands. He is thought to have afterwards proceeded to Australia to his cousins (John Dunn). Information will be thankfully received by his sister, Mrs. Honorey Brown, 23 Spamount Street, Belfast, Ireland. Australian papers please copy.

M'MULLIN -- Catherine M'Mullin, Moneyglass, Toome, Co. Antrim, would like to hear of the whereabouts of her son Willie. Was a boilermaker and moulder in Chicago. Was seen in California about five or six years ago. American papers please copy.

HARPUR -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Joseph Harpur, formerly of Addavoyle, Armagh, who left Belfast for America in the year 1881 Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his daughter, Mrs. Jane Smyth, wife of Mr. George Smyth, James Street, off Shankill Road, Belfast, Ireland. American papers please copy.

HOWEY -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Annie Howey, married name Fee, who left Belfast some years ago for America. Any information will be thankfully received by her sister, Gertrude Howey, 9 Shandon Street, Belfast.

TUNNEY -- Bridget Tunney, maiden name Hanratty, last heard of was from Barrow-in-Furness. If she would write to M. Hanratty, 38 King Street, Newry, she would hear of something to her advantage.

BLAIR -- Wanted to hear of Thomas Orr Blair, tailor, who formerly resided at Hillview Street, Belfast, or any of his friends. His son, Samuel Blair, Hotel Frances, Pana, Illinois, U.S.A., inquires.

DAVIDSON -- Information of the whereabouts of William Davidson, of Killucan, Westmeath, a carpenter, would be gratefully received by his mother, who resides at the above address.

DODDS -- Wanted to hear of William Ross Dodds. Last heard of in St. Louis, U.S.A., 18 months ago. Any information will be gratefully received by his sister, Miss Ross, 59c High Street, Forres, Morayshire, Scotland.

COLVILLE -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Thomas Colville, who left Belfast twelve years ago, and was last heard of at St. Marie, Ontario. Any information will be gratefully received by his brother, John Colville, 77 Donegall Pass, Belfast, Ireland.

FITZSIMMONS -- Wanted to bear of Miss Ruby Fitzsimmons, of Millisle, Co. Down, who left Belfast for Carlton St., Toronto, Canada. Please reply to Rifleman Hugh Graham, No. 17383 D. Co. 9th R.I. Rifles, B.E. Force, France.

KEENAN -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of John M. Keenan, who left Belfast almost seven years ago on board an American fruit boat. Last heard of as going to Alaska. Any information will be thankfully received by his wife Isabella Keenan, 20 Bridge End, Belfast, Ireland. American papers please copy.

SMYTH -- Wanted information regarding Robert Smyth, formerly of Carnmoney, County Antrim. Last heard of at Nevada, U.S.A. Information thankfully received by Messrs. Potts & Houston, Ltd., 113 North Street, Belfast.

WEIR -- Wanted to hear of Charles G. Weir, who went to the United States in February, 1908, residing at Fall River Massachusetts for two years. He then moved to the Western States, and has written occasionally from Montana, Dakota, and Washington Territory. He was employed on cattle ranches in the States. Last heard of in Hope, North Dakota. Said he he would probably go to Canada or New Mexico. Anv information regarding him will be thankfully received by his mother, Sarah Weir, 87 Brookmount Street, Belfast, Ireland.

HILL -- The sisters of Mrs. Barbara Hill are anxious to know of her whereabouts. When last heard of 15 years ago she was living in San Francisco. Any information regarding her will be thankfully received by her sister, Louisa Carpenter, 200 Mayo Street, off Springfield Road, Belfast.

GORDON -- Wanted to know, the whereabouts of Miss Maggie Gordon, last heard of from Sandy, Oregon, in February, 1915. Any information concerning her will be thankfully received by Sergeant Robert Gordon, R.I.C., Larne, County Antrim. Ireland. American papers please copy.

CLARKE -- Information wanted to the whereabouts of Matthew Clarke, 17 years of age, lately employed by a farmer in Canada; but left suddenly, and last heard of as being in the State of Minnesota, U.S.A. Any news of his whereabouts will be thankfully received by his father, Matthew Clarke, 10 Central Street, Belfast, Ireland. United States and Canadian papers please copy.

ALVIN -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of any of the relations of James Alvin, who was born in Belfast or vicinity about sixty ago, and died lately in California. About two years ago he left California to visit his old home, and on his return stated he had been in Belfast. Any information may be sent to Geo. I. Browne, 2 Carleton Street, Portadown, Ireland.

APPLEBY -- If Mrs. Appleby (maiden name Turner), of Belfast, who inquired in this column some time ago for information concerning her brother, John Turner, will write to him at 92 Garngad Hill, Town Head, Glasgow, he will be glad to hear from her.

WYLIE -- Information as to the present address of Violet Wylie (aged 12), late Ballymacuillen, Aldergrove, Co. Antrim, will be thankfully received by Mrs. J. Gorman, Tully, Crumlin, Co Antrim.

 

^ top of page

Larne Times - Saturday, 8 July 1916

Death

LEGG -- June 30, 1916, at the residence of her father, Eagle Hotel, Larne, Annie, youngest daughter of William B. Legg. -- R.I.P. Interred in M'Garel Cemetery, Larne, on Sunday, July 2nd.

In Memoriam

M'INTOSH -- In loving memory of my dear wife, Sarah Mary M'Intosh, who departed this life 5th July, 1915, and was interred in Connor New Cemetery. Inserted by her loving Husband. SAMUEL M'INTOSH. 68 01d Glenarm Road, Larne.

M'INTOSH -- In loving memory of my dear daughter, Sarah Mary, who departed this life on the 5th July, 1915, and was interred in Connor New Cemetery.
Gone, dear Sarah, and forgotten by some you may be,
   But the grave that contains you is sacred to me;
If you were but here great changes you'd see,
   But heavenly rest is far better for thee.
Ever remembered by her loving Mother, Sister, and Brother. ANN JANE BAILIE. Waterloo Road, Larne.

Clippings

The Editors Note-Book

At Belfast last week Mr. Leslie M'Mordie (son of Mrs. M'Mordie, Larne Harbour) was presented with the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society for saving life at sea. The presentation was made by the Lord Mayor (Sir Crawford M'Cullagh) in the presence of a distinguished company, many of whom paid handsome tributes to the gallantry and presence of mind of the young hero. Mr. M'Mordie is second officer of the Howth Head, and the gallant act which haa been suitably recognised was performed at New Orleans. His Larne friends sincerely join in the chorus of congratulation to him.

-- -- -- -- --

That H.M.S. Larne is still to the fore and doing good work is evident from a passage in a letter written by a Larne man in the Royal Naval Air Service, and now stationed in Kent. He mentions that one of their airships recently, whilst on a journey from Kent to Cornwall, ran short of petrol and dropped into the sea. The crew were all lost with the exception of the wireless operator, who was brought into port by H.M.S.. Larne.

-- -- -- -- --

In the list of successes at the recent final examination for solicitors we are pleased to observe the name of Mr. William L. Skelton, Carrickfergus. Mr. Skelton, who for some years has acted as managing clerk for Mr. R. J. Porter, solicitor, is well known and much esteemed throughout the district, and his many friends will join in wishing him every success in his future legal career.

-- -- -- -- --

From the Department of Agriculture for Ireland we have received copies of recently-revised pamphlets (which are worthy the attention of every farmer in Ireland) on "Forestry: Trees for Poles and Timber," "The Cultivation of Osiers" (for the manufacture of baskets), and "Calf Rearing." The latter, especially, should be in every farmhouse in the kingdom. When it is remembered that more than three-quarters of a million head of cattle (the average for the decade 1906-1915 was 833,708) are annually exported from Ireland to Great Britain, and that these exports represent an annual income of many millions of pounds, it is very obvious that this trade is of the greatest importance to Irish farmers, and too much care cannot be expended on fostering its development. Copies of the pamphlets referred to can be obtained free of charge and post free on application to the Secretary of the Department of Agriculture, Dublin, and letters of application so addressed need not be stamped.

-- -- -- -- --

We feel sure that all thoughtful residents will approve of the proposal of the Larne Urban Council to institute a scheme for the protection and care of infant lives and mothers. It is more and more recognised that the true wealth of an Empire lies in the uprearing of a sturdy healthy race, and the terrible wastage of the best blood on the battlefields to-day makes the outlook a still more serious one. If anything can be done to reduce that infant mortality which is a blot on our civilisation, then all right-thinking citizens will agree that it is the duty of the State (working for convenience through local authorities) to take those measures which education and experience have decided are most effective. The care of infants and their mothers at a critical time is obviously work which can best be performed by a committee of ladies of experience, and we sincerely trust the Larne District Nursing Society will accept the proposal of the Council, and work a scheme which must have a far-reaching results on the prosperity and health of the community.

-- -- -- -- --

During the past week some seventeen members of the Larne Grammar School Troop of Boy Scouts, by the very kind permission of the Earl of Antrim, have been encamped in the Deerpark adjoining the demesne at Glenarm Castle. Under the care of their scoutmaster, Mr. Wilfrid Booth (whose departure from the Grammar School is a real misfortune), the boys have had a real good time amidst most delightful surroundings.

-- -- -- -- --

"In my opinion the only true economy to be effected in respect of water-bound macadamised roads is to extend the system of tar-spraying as much as possible, and I am satisfied that at least twice as great a life can be obtained by tar-spraying instead of water-binding for the same expenditure of money." (Mr. J. S. Brodie, M.I.C.E., in his presidential address at the conference of the Institution of Municipal aud County Engineers, held in Blackpool last week).

-- -- -- -- --

The christening of the infant son of Captain Sir John Smiley, Bart., and Lady Smiley took place on Friday last at the Chapel, Royal Hospital, Chelsea, the rite being performed by the chaplain, the Rev. Reginald Mossley, M.A., S.C.F. The child received the name of David de Crespigny, and the sponsers were Lieutenant-Colonel Champion de Crespigny, D.S.O., Grenadier Guards (for whom Mrs. de Crespigny stood proxy), Brigadier-General P. P. de B. Radcliffe, D.S.O. (for whom Lord Ludlow stood proxy), Lieutenant-Colonel A. F. Watt, D.S.O., and Mrs. Loeffler.

-- -- -- -- --

Now that our troops have taken the offensive on the Western front it is obvious that we may expect a big casualty list, and already news is beginning to come through of casualties in the 12th Royal Irish Rifles. The reality is in all probability bad enough, but may we impress upon our readers the foolishness of giving credence to the many wild rumours which seem to be set on foot every hour of the day, and also urge them to strongly discourage the spread of such rumours by every means in their power, in an offensive movement casualties are bound to occur, and it is some comfort to remember that even the slightest wounds are chronicled, that the proportion of killed or seriously wounded is abnormally low to the total number of casualties, and that the medical and nursing staff admittedly as effective and perfect human arrangement can provide.

-- -- -- -- --

Mrs. M'Manus, of Mountpleasant, Larne, has been officially notified that her son, Sergt. James M'Manus, of the 12th Royal Irish Rifles, has been seriously wounded, and is in hospital at Rouen. Rifleman George Fullerton, of the same battalion (second son of Mr. David Fullerton, Cross Street), has been slightly wounded, and other casualties are spoken of, though official notification has not yet come to hand.

-- -- -- -- --

At the special request of Major-General Simms, Chaplain-in-Chief to the Forces, the Rev. D H. Hanson, B.A., of Gardenmore Presbyterian Church, has been gazetted by the War Office to an Army chaplaincy. We understand that Mr. Hanson's services are to be utilised in a special capacity, and that he will be attached to Dr. Simms' Staff at Head-quarters.

-- -- -- -- --

In their bereavement by the death of their daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Legg, of the Eagle Hotel, Larne, have the sincere sympathy of a host of friends. Miss Annie Patricia Legg was but 15 years of age, and had only been ill a month. She was a great favourite at Larne and also at Randalstown and Toome, where she had spent a good deal of time. The interment at the M'Garel Cemetery on Sunday afternoon last (the Rev. R. M'Cudden, C.C., officiating) was very largely attended, and there were some beautiful floral tributes of affection and regret.

-- -- -- -- --

We understand that Capt. Wm. Torrance Smith, M.B., R.A.M.C. (attached to the King's Liverpool Regiment), son of the late Mr. Robert Gardiner Smith, J.P., Mid-Calder, and brother-in-law of the Rev. John Lyle Donaghy, Larne, has been seriously wounded, and is now in hospital at Rouen.

-- -- -- -- --

The many friends of Miss Dooley, the accomplished bookkeeper at the King's Arms Hotel, Larne, greatly regret her decision to return to her home in Queen's County, and on Monday night last, in the Castle Sweeney Hotel, they gave expression to their feelings of regret, and in a tangible way testified to the high-esteem they had for Miss Dooley, who has won golden opinions from all with whom she came in contact during her stay in Larne of almost four years. Mr. John M'Auley occupied the chair, and the presentation of a gold wristlet watch was made by Mr. W. M'E. Carson, whilst Mr. Archibald and Mr. A. Heggarty also took part. On behalf of a number of naval visitors, Miss Dooley was presented by Mrs. Walker with a handsome gold brooch set with diamonds, and one and all joined in words of appreciation and regret at the severance of an agreeable acquaintanceship.

-- -- -- -- --

Mr. W. Crawford, assistant at Lame No. 1 N.S., has been appointed principal teacher of Toreagh N.S., near Larne, as from the 4th inst., in the place of Mr. M'Intyre, resigned. Mr. Crawford has the unique record of having been successively pupil, monitor, and assistant at the "Back Road School" and his success is a gratification to all connected with the school, though his departure is much regretted. Before leaving school on Monday evening last the pupils showed their appreciation of Mr. Crawford by making him the recipient of a very handsome dressing-case, the presentation being made by Miss Anna Snoddy, one of the senior pupils. The principal, Mr. T. H. Pullin, added a meed of appreciation, and expressed his personal regret, and Mr. Crawford appropriately replied.

=========================

HEROES OF THE AIR.

SOME EXCITING INCIDENTS.

BRITISH AVIATORS' FEATS.

LONDON, Saturday. -- A resume of incidents extracted from recent reports of the Royal Flying Corps in France was issued through the Press Bureau this afternoon. Among several exciting incidents reported are the following:--

June 1. -- A kito balloon was carried away by a sudden gust. The occupants both made parachute descents, landing safely. Lieutenant F helped Lieutenant G before descending himself, and consequently landed close to the trenches. Hostile machine-guns opened fire on him, but he escaped unhurt. The balloon drifted over the German lines.

June 8. -- Lieutenant H and Lieutenant J directed a battery on to a train at Salome. Six direct hits resulted, and the train was set on fire, and was seen to be still burning an hour and a half later.

June 17. -- Lieut. N. and Lieut. M.. left to intercept a hostile reconnaisance. Eight hostile machines were observed approaching at 7,500 feet. The British machines flew towards them, and when almost directly underneath, Lieut. N. opened fire on the nearest machine, then turned, and when at 400 feet below the German formation opened fire into one of the tail machines. A few minutes later this machine was seen to glide down, landing just north of Bois de Biez. Lieut. M. now endeavoured to cut off the main body of hostile machines. In this he failed, but succeeded in catching the last hostile machine just over tho trenches at 6,000 feet. When within one hundred yards the German dived steeply, followed by our machine firing at about fifty yards' range. The enemy observer appeared to be out of action, as no reply was made to our fire. Our machine continued the pursuit, and the German was seen to land.

=========================

BALLYMENA SESSIONS.

COMPENSATION CLAIMS.

His Honour Judge Orr, K.C., resumed the business of these sessions in the Ballymena Courthouse.

Mrs. Margaret R. Lowry, Donegore, Antrim, applied for 120 compensation for the alleged malicious burning of a dwelling-house, her property, at Galdanagh, near Carnlough.

His Honour gave a decree for 50, with 1 witnesses' expenses, to be levied off the electoral divisions of Glencloy, Ardelines, Glenarm, Longmore, and Slemish.

Mr. John Adrain, solicitor (Messrs J. & A. Caruth), applied for payment of a sum of 10 out of the monev in court to the credit of Elsie Moore, Ballymena, a minor, at present being educated at the Masonic Orphan Schools, Dublin. His Honour granted the application.

An application was made by Patrick Murray, Waterfoot, against Messrs. Mann, M'Neill, & Co., Ltd., Glasgow, owners of the s.s. Southford, for compensation for the death of applicant's son, John Murray, who was lost at sea. His Honour awarded 200 compensation. 195 to go to Rose Murray, mother of the deceased, and 5 to the father, Patrick Murray.

His Honour granted the application of Mr. H. M. Thompson, B.L. (instructed by Messrs. O'Rorke, M'Donald, and Tweed, solicitors, Larne), for payment out of court of the sum of 69 16s. which had been transferred from the Lancashire County Court to the credit of William John Erwin, Eglinton Terrace, Glenarm, applicant, and the Ford Shipping Company, Ltd., 45 Hope Street, Glasgow, owners of the s.s. Northford, respondents.

In the case of O'Dornan v. Carnlough Lime Company, Daniel O'Dornan, Carnlough, was the applicant, and the Carnlough Lime Company respondents, applicant claiming compensation for injuries received arising out of his employment. His Honour said that it appearing that the respondents had offered to take applicant back into their employment and do suitable light work at 16s 3d per week, he would make an award for the difference of 1s 7d a week, respondents to pay costs and 2 10s witnesses' expenses. If applicant was not fit to work he gave liberty for him to apply again in October.

=========================

Missing Relatives

NELSON -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of William Edward Clarke Nelson, eldest son of the late Joseph Nelson, watchmaker and Jeweller, Dromore, Co. Down, Ireland, last heard of in a jeweller's shop in Newcastle-on-Tyne, England. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his sister, Mrs. Agnes Nelson Innis, 24 Hartington Street, Dublin Road, Belfast, Ireland. American and Australian papers please copy.

IRWINE -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of George Irwine. Last heard of about six years ago in Inverary. Loomoviap, Invereil, New South Wales. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his mother -- Mrs. George Irwine, Glenoe, Larne, Ireland Australian papers please copy.

DARCUS -- Wanted to know the address of William Darcus, last heard of he was living in Sydney, Australia; carpenter by trade. Any information regarding him will be appreciated by his sister. -- Mary Harrison, 11 Fingal Street, Belfast, Ireland.

M'DONNELL -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Bella M'Donnell, aged about 20 years, last heard of seven years ago, when she was residing in the Falls Road district of Belfast. Any information will bo thankfully received by her sister, Miss Mary M'Donnell, c/o Forster Green Hospital, Belfast, Ireland.

M'ILWRATH -- Wanted to hear of Mary Ann M'Ilwrath, who left Belfast about 12 years ago for Canada. Heard of 8 years ago at Kelong, British Columbia, Information will be thankfully received by her brother, Rifleman James M'Ilwrath, C Co. 9th Batt R.I. Rifles, British Expeditionary Force, France.

LUSK -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Anna Lusk (maiden name); last heard of about 30 years ago in New York. Her cousin Mrs. Calvert, 116 Bryson Street, Belfast, Ireland, would be grateful for news about her.

MAXWELL -- Wanted to hear of Arthur or John Maxwell, formerly of Lisburn. Their brother, Robert Maxwell, of 509 Holden Avenue, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A., inquires.

HAMILTON -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of John Hamilton, formerly of Magheragall, Lisburn, who was last heard of four years ago in New York. Any information will be gratefully received by his sister, Miss Elizabeth Hamilton, 26 Winchester Street, Belfast, Ireland.

JONNSTON--GIBSON -- If this should meet the eye of Mrs. Andrew Gibson, formerly Annie Johnston, will she please communicate with her brother, Maurice Johnston, who will be glad to hear from her. Address Maurice Johnston, 48 Caselli Avenue, San Francisco, California. U.S.A.

GREENFIELD -- James (present age, 34), and Samuel (present age, 32), left Drummiller, near Gilford, for U.S.A. in summer of 1903. James, when last heard from, was in New York, and Samuel in Alleghenny, Pa. Present address desired by brother, Robert Henry, c/o 13 Newry Street, Banbridge, Co. Down.

M'AVOY -- Wanted to hear of Daniel M'Avoy. Last heard of thirty years ago St. Heliers, Jersey, Channel Islands. He is thought to have afterwards proceeded to Australia to his cousin (John Dunn). Information will be thankfully received by his sister, Mrs. Honorey Brown, 25 Spamount Street, Belfast, Ireland. Australian papers please copy.

M'MULLIN -- Catherine M'Mullin, Moneyglass, Toome, Co. Antrim, would like to hear of the whereabouts of her son Willie. Was a boilermaker and moulder in Chicago. Was seen in California about five or six years ago. American papers please copy.

HARPUR -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Joseph Harpur, formerly of Addavoyle, Armagh, who left Belfast for America in the year 1881. Any information concerning him will be thankfully received by his daughter, Mrs. Jane Smyth, wife of Mr. George Smyth, 36 James Street, off Shankill Road, Belfast, Ireland. American papers please copy.

HOWEY -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Annie Howey, married name Fee, who left Belfast some years ago for America. Any information will be thankfully received by her sister, Gertrude Howey, 9 Shandon Street, Belfast.

TUNNEY -- Bridget Tunney, maiden name Hanratty, last heard of was from Barrow-in-Furness. If she would write to M. Hanratty, 36 King Stree, Newry, she would hear of something to her advantage.

BLAIR -- Wanted to hear of Thomas Orr Blair, tailor, who formerly resided at Hillview Street, Belfast, or any of his friends. His son, Samuel Blair, Hotel Frances, Pana, Illinois, U.S.A., inquires.

DAVIDSON -- information of the whereabouts of William Davidson, of Killucan, Westmeath, a carpenter, would be gratefully received by his mother, who resides at the above address.

DODDS -- Wanted to hear of William Ross Dodds. Last heard of in St. Louis, U.S.A., 18 months ago. Any information will be gratefully received by his sister, Miss Ross, 59c High Street, Forres, Morayshire, Scotland.

COLVILLE -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of Thomas Colville, who left Belfast twelve years ago, and was last heard of at St. Marie, Ontario. Any information will be gratefullv received by his brother, John Colville, 77 Donegall Pass, Belfast, Ireland.

FITZSIMMONS -- Wanted to hear of Miss Ruby Fitzsimmons, of Millisle, Co. Down, who left Belfast for Carlton St., Toronto, Canada. Please reply to Rifleman Hugh Graham, No. 17/383 D. Co. 9th R.I. Rifles, B.E. Force, France.

KEENAN -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of John M. Keenan, who left Belfast almost seven years ago on board an American fruit boat. Last heard of as going to Alaska. Any information will be thankfully received by his wife Isabella Keenan, 29 Bridge End, Belfast, Ireland. American papers please copy.

SMYTH -- Wanted information regarding Robert Smyth, formerly of Carnmoney, County Antrim, last heard of at Nevada, U.S.A. Information thankfully received by Messrs. Potts & Houston, Ltd., 115 North Street, Belfast.

WEIR -- Wanted to hear of Charles G. Weir, who went to the United States in February, 1908, residing at Fall River Massachusetts for two years. He then moved to the Western States, and has written occasionally from Montana, Dakota, and Washington Territory. He was employed on cattle ranches in the States. Last heard of in Hope, North Dakota. Said he would probably go to Canada or New Mexico. Any information regarding him will be thankfully received by his mother, Sarah Weir, 87 Brookmount Street, Belfast, Ireland.

HILL -- The sisters of Mrs. Barbara Hill are anxious to know of her whereabouts. When last heard of 15 years ago she was living in San Francisco. Any information regarding her will be thankfully received by her sister, Louisa Carpenter, 200 Mayo Street, off Springfield Road, Belfast.

GORDON -- Wanted to know, the whereabouts of Miss Maggie Gordon, last heard of from Sandy, Oregon, in February, 1915. Any information concerning her will be thankfully received by Sergeant Robert Gordon, R.I.C., Larne, County Antrim, Ireland. American papers please copy.

CLARKE -- Information wanted as to the whereabouts of Matthew Clarke, 17 years of age, lately employed by a farmer in Canada; but left suddenly, and last heard of as being in the State of Minnesota, U.S.A. Any news of his whereabouts will be thankfully received by his father, Matthew Clarke, 10 Central Street, Belfast, Ireland. United States and Canadian papers please copy.

ALVIN -- Wanted to know the whereabouts of any of the relations of James Alvin, who was born in Belfast or vicinity about sixty years ago, and died lately in California. About two years ago he left California to visit his old home, and on his return stated he had been in Belfast. Any information may be sent to Geo. I. Browne, 2 Carleton Street, Portadown, Ireland.

APPLEBY -- If Mrs. Appleby (maiden name Turner), of Belfast, who inquired in this column some time ago for information concerning her brother, John Turner, will write to him at 92 Garngad Hill, Town Head, Glasgow, he will be glad to bear from her.

WYLIE -- Information as to the present address of Violet Wylie (aged 12), late Ballymaquillen, Aldergrove, Co. Antrim, will be thankfully received by Mrs. J. Gorman, Tully, Crumlin, Co. Antrim.

 

^ top of page